Novel Size and Surface Oxide Effects in Silicon Nanowires as Lithium Battery Anodes

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599012
Title:
Novel Size and Surface Oxide Effects in Silicon Nanowires as Lithium Battery Anodes
Authors:
McDowell, Matthew T.; Lee, Seok Woo; Ryu, Ill; Wu, Hui; Nix, William D.; Choi, Jang Wook; Cui, Yi
Abstract:
With its high specific capacity, silicon is a promising anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries, but volume expansion and fracture during lithium reaction have prevented implementation. Si nanostructures have shown resistance to fracture during cycling, but the critical effects of nanostructure size and native surface oxide on volume expansion and cycling performance are not understood. Here, we use an ex situ transmission electron microscopy technique to observe the same Si nanowires before and after lithiation and have discovered the impacts of size and surface oxide on volume expansion. For nanowires with native SiO2, the surface oxide can suppress the volume expansion during lithiation for nanowires with diameters <∼50 nm. Finite element modeling shows that the oxide layer can induce compressive hydrostatic stress that could act to limit the extent of lithiation. The understanding developed herein of how volume expansion and extent of lithiation can depend on nanomaterial structure is important for the improvement of Si-based anodes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
McDowell MT, Lee SW, Ryu I, Wu H, Nix WD, et al. (2011) Novel Size and Surface Oxide Effects in Silicon Nanowires as Lithium Battery Anodes. Nano Lett 11: 4018–4025. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl202630n.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Nano Letters
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-11-001-12; KUK-F1-038-02
Issue Date:
14-Sep-2011
DOI:
10.1021/nl202630n
PubMed ID:
21827158
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1530-6984; 1530-6992
Sponsors:
J.W.C. acknowledges the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (MEST) for financial support through the Secondary Battery Program (NRT-2010-0029031) and the World Class University Program for financial support (R-31-2008-000-10055-0). Y.C. acknowledges support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Investigator Award (No. KUS-11-001-12). A portion of this work is supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, Subcontract No. 6951379 under the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program. Additionally, a portion of this work is supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under contract DE-AC02-76SF0051 through the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory LDRD project. S.W.L. acknowledges support from KAUST (Award No. KUK-F1-038-02). M.T.M. acknowledges support from the Chevron Stanford Graduate Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. I.R. and W.D.N. gratefully acknowledge support the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER46163). A portion of this work is supported by the Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion (CNEEC) at Stanford University, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001060.
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Matthew T.en
dc.contributor.authorLee, Seok Wooen
dc.contributor.authorRyu, Illen
dc.contributor.authorWu, Huien
dc.contributor.authorNix, William D.en
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Jang Wooken
dc.contributor.authorCui, Yien
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:51:10Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:51:10Zen
dc.date.issued2011-09-14en
dc.identifier.citationMcDowell MT, Lee SW, Ryu I, Wu H, Nix WD, et al. (2011) Novel Size and Surface Oxide Effects in Silicon Nanowires as Lithium Battery Anodes. Nano Lett 11: 4018–4025. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl202630n.en
dc.identifier.issn1530-6984en
dc.identifier.issn1530-6992en
dc.identifier.pmid21827158en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/nl202630nen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599012en
dc.description.abstractWith its high specific capacity, silicon is a promising anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries, but volume expansion and fracture during lithium reaction have prevented implementation. Si nanostructures have shown resistance to fracture during cycling, but the critical effects of nanostructure size and native surface oxide on volume expansion and cycling performance are not understood. Here, we use an ex situ transmission electron microscopy technique to observe the same Si nanowires before and after lithiation and have discovered the impacts of size and surface oxide on volume expansion. For nanowires with native SiO2, the surface oxide can suppress the volume expansion during lithiation for nanowires with diameters <∼50 nm. Finite element modeling shows that the oxide layer can induce compressive hydrostatic stress that could act to limit the extent of lithiation. The understanding developed herein of how volume expansion and extent of lithiation can depend on nanomaterial structure is important for the improvement of Si-based anodes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipJ.W.C. acknowledges the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (MEST) for financial support through the Secondary Battery Program (NRT-2010-0029031) and the World Class University Program for financial support (R-31-2008-000-10055-0). Y.C. acknowledges support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Investigator Award (No. KUS-11-001-12). A portion of this work is supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, Subcontract No. 6951379 under the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program. Additionally, a portion of this work is supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under contract DE-AC02-76SF0051 through the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory LDRD project. S.W.L. acknowledges support from KAUST (Award No. KUK-F1-038-02). M.T.M. acknowledges support from the Chevron Stanford Graduate Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. I.R. and W.D.N. gratefully acknowledge support the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER46163). A portion of this work is supported by the Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion (CNEEC) at Stanford University, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001060.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectEnergy storageen
dc.subjectLi-ion batteriesen
dc.subjectnanowiresen
dc.titleNovel Size and Surface Oxide Effects in Silicon Nanowires as Lithium Battery Anodesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNano Lettersen
dc.contributor.institutionStanford University, Palo Alto, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionKorea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Yusong, South Koreaen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-11-001-12en
kaust.grant.numberKUK-F1-038-02en

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