Morphological quantification of hierarchical geomaterials by X-ray nano-CT bridges the gap from nano to micro length scales

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598890
Title:
Morphological quantification of hierarchical geomaterials by X-ray nano-CT bridges the gap from nano to micro length scales
Authors:
Brisard, S.; Chae, R. S.; Bihannic, I.; Michot, L.; Guttmann, P.; Thieme, J.; Schneider, G.; Monteiro, P. J. M.; Levitz, P.
Abstract:
Morphological quantification of the complex structure of hierarchical geomaterials is of great relevance for Earth science and environmental engineering, among others. To date, methods that quantify the 3D morphology on length scales ranging from a few tens of nanometers to several hun-dred nanometers have had limited success. We demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to go beyond visualization and to extract quantitative morphological information from X-ray images in the aforementioned length scales. As examples, two different hierarchical geomaterials exhibiting complex porous structures ranging from nanometer to macroscopic scale are studied: a flocculated clay water suspension and two hydrated cement pastes. We show that from a single projection image it is possible to perform a direct computation of the ultra-small angle-scattering spectra. The predictions matched very well the experimental data obtained by the best ultra-small angle-scattering experimental setups as observed for the cement paste. In this context, we demonstrate that the structure of flocculated clay suspension exhibit two well-distinct regimes of aggregation, a dense mass fractal aggregation at short distance and a more open structure at large distance, which can be generated by a 3D reaction limited cluster-cluster aggregation process. For the first time, a high-resolution 3D image of fibrillar cement paste cluster was obtained from limited angle nanotomography.
Publisher:
GeoScienceWorld
Journal:
American Mineralogist
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-11-004021
Issue Date:
30-Jan-2012
DOI:
10.2138/am.2012.3985
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0003-004X
Sponsors:
This publication was based on work supported in part by ANR program M POMODIM, the CNRS-CPR "Porosity, transport, and resistance" program and Award No. KUS-11-004021, made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We thank M. Thiery and V. Baroghel-Bouny at IFFSTAR (Paris) for providing the two-year-old cement paste. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments were carried out on beamline A2 at Hasylab (flocculated clays) and at SOLEIL on beamline SWING (cement paste). This work is dedicated to the memory of Olivier Coussy (1952-2010).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrisard, S.en
dc.contributor.authorChae, R. S.en
dc.contributor.authorBihannic, I.en
dc.contributor.authorMichot, L.en
dc.contributor.authorGuttmann, P.en
dc.contributor.authorThieme, J.en
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, G.en
dc.contributor.authorMonteiro, P. J. M.en
dc.contributor.authorLevitz, P.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:43:10Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:43:10Zen
dc.date.issued2012-01-30en
dc.identifier.issn0003-004Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.2138/am.2012.3985en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598890en
dc.description.abstractMorphological quantification of the complex structure of hierarchical geomaterials is of great relevance for Earth science and environmental engineering, among others. To date, methods that quantify the 3D morphology on length scales ranging from a few tens of nanometers to several hun-dred nanometers have had limited success. We demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to go beyond visualization and to extract quantitative morphological information from X-ray images in the aforementioned length scales. As examples, two different hierarchical geomaterials exhibiting complex porous structures ranging from nanometer to macroscopic scale are studied: a flocculated clay water suspension and two hydrated cement pastes. We show that from a single projection image it is possible to perform a direct computation of the ultra-small angle-scattering spectra. The predictions matched very well the experimental data obtained by the best ultra-small angle-scattering experimental setups as observed for the cement paste. In this context, we demonstrate that the structure of flocculated clay suspension exhibit two well-distinct regimes of aggregation, a dense mass fractal aggregation at short distance and a more open structure at large distance, which can be generated by a 3D reaction limited cluster-cluster aggregation process. For the first time, a high-resolution 3D image of fibrillar cement paste cluster was obtained from limited angle nanotomography.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis publication was based on work supported in part by ANR program M POMODIM, the CNRS-CPR "Porosity, transport, and resistance" program and Award No. KUS-11-004021, made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We thank M. Thiery and V. Baroghel-Bouny at IFFSTAR (Paris) for providing the two-year-old cement paste. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments were carried out on beamline A2 at Hasylab (flocculated clays) and at SOLEIL on beamline SWING (cement paste). This work is dedicated to the memory of Olivier Coussy (1952-2010).en
dc.publisherGeoScienceWorlden
dc.subjectCement pastesen
dc.subjectClay suspensionen
dc.subjectNew techniqueen
dc.subjectX-ray nanotomographyen
dc.titleMorphological quantification of hierarchical geomaterials by X-ray nano-CT bridges the gap from nano to micro length scalesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Mineralogisten
dc.contributor.institutionIFSTTAR - French institute of science and technology for transport, development and networks, Marne-la-Vallee, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUC Berkeley, Berkeley, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionNancy-Universite, Nancy, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionHelmholtz-Zentrum für Materialen und Energie GmbH, Berlin, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionBrookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, Franceen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-11-004021en
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