Microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestration

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598825
Title:
Microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestration
Authors:
Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E.
Abstract:
Mineral carbonation can be used for CO2 sequestration, but the reaction rate is slow. In order to accelerate mineral carbonation, acid generated in a microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) was examined to dissolve natural minerals rich in magnesium/calcium silicates (serpentine), and the alkali generated by the same process was used to absorb CO2 and precipitate magnesium/calcium carbonates. The concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ dissolved from serpentine increased 20 and 145 times by using the acid solution. Under optimal conditions, 24mg of CO2 was absorbed into the alkaline solution and 13mg of CO2 was precipitated as magnesium/calcium carbonates over a fed-batch cycle (24h). Additionally, the MEDCC removed 94% of the COD (initially 822mg/L) and achieved 22% desalination (initially 35g/L NaCl). These results demonstrate the viability of this process for effective CO2 sequestration using renewable organic matter and natural minerals. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.
Citation:
Zhu X, Logan BE (2014) Microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestration. Bioresource Technology 159: 24–29. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2014.02.062.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Bioresource Technology
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-003-13
Issue Date:
May-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.biortech.2014.02.062
PubMed ID:
24632437
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0960-8524
Sponsors:
The authors acknowledge support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) by Award KUS-I1-003-13. The authors would also like to thank Dr. George Alexander from the Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, for providing natural minerals.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Xiupingen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:41:58Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:41:58Zen
dc.date.issued2014-05en
dc.identifier.citationZhu X, Logan BE (2014) Microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestration. Bioresource Technology 159: 24–29. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2014.02.062.en
dc.identifier.issn0960-8524en
dc.identifier.pmid24632437en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biortech.2014.02.062en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598825en
dc.description.abstractMineral carbonation can be used for CO2 sequestration, but the reaction rate is slow. In order to accelerate mineral carbonation, acid generated in a microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) was examined to dissolve natural minerals rich in magnesium/calcium silicates (serpentine), and the alkali generated by the same process was used to absorb CO2 and precipitate magnesium/calcium carbonates. The concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ dissolved from serpentine increased 20 and 145 times by using the acid solution. Under optimal conditions, 24mg of CO2 was absorbed into the alkaline solution and 13mg of CO2 was precipitated as magnesium/calcium carbonates over a fed-batch cycle (24h). Additionally, the MEDCC removed 94% of the COD (initially 822mg/L) and achieved 22% desalination (initially 35g/L NaCl). These results demonstrate the viability of this process for effective CO2 sequestration using renewable organic matter and natural minerals. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) by Award KUS-I1-003-13. The authors would also like to thank Dr. George Alexander from the Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, for providing natural minerals.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectDesalinationen
dc.subjectMicrobial electrolysisen
dc.subjectMineral carbonationen
dc.subjectSerpentineen
dc.titleMicrobial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestrationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBioresource Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionPennsylvania State University, State College, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13en
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.