Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598824
Title:
Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter
Authors:
Logan, Bruce E.; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V. M.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rozendal, René A.
Abstract:
The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment. © 2008 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
Logan BE, Call D, Cheng S, Hamelers HVM, Sleutels THJA, et al. (2008) Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter. Environ Sci Technol 42: 8630–8640. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es801553z.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Environmental Science & Technology
Issue Date:
Dec-2008
DOI:
10.1021/es801553z
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0013-936X; 1520-5851
Sponsors:
This review was supported by the following: the National Science Foundation (CBET-0730359) and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (B.E.L); the KAUST Global Research Partnership (BEL and S.C.); a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Water Research Institute Ronald B. Linsky Fellowship (D.C.); SenterNovem (NEO Grant 0268-03-04-04-002) and the Australian Research Council (DP 0666927) (R-A.R). Wetsus is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, the city of Leeuwarden, the Province of Fryslan, the European Union European Regional Development Fund, and the EZ-KOMPAS Program of the "Samenwerkingsverband Noord/Nederland". We thank the participants of the theme "Hydrogen" for their input and contributions: Shell, Paques by, and Magneto Special Anodes by.
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.en
dc.contributor.authorCall, Douglasen
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Shaoanen
dc.contributor.authorHamelers, Hubertus V. M.en
dc.contributor.authorSleutels, Tom H. J. A.en
dc.contributor.authorJeremiasse, Adriaan W.en
dc.contributor.authorRozendal, René A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:41:57Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:41:57Zen
dc.date.issued2008-12en
dc.identifier.citationLogan BE, Call D, Cheng S, Hamelers HVM, Sleutels THJA, et al. (2008) Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter. Environ Sci Technol 42: 8630–8640. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es801553z.en
dc.identifier.issn0013-936Xen
dc.identifier.issn1520-5851en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/es801553zen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598824en
dc.description.abstractThe use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment. © 2008 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis review was supported by the following: the National Science Foundation (CBET-0730359) and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (B.E.L); the KAUST Global Research Partnership (BEL and S.C.); a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Water Research Institute Ronald B. Linsky Fellowship (D.C.); SenterNovem (NEO Grant 0268-03-04-04-002) and the Australian Research Council (DP 0666927) (R-A.R). Wetsus is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, the city of Leeuwarden, the Province of Fryslan, the European Union European Regional Development Fund, and the EZ-KOMPAS Program of the "Samenwerkingsverband Noord/Nederland". We thank the participants of the theme "Hydrogen" for their input and contributions: Shell, Paques by, and Magneto Special Anodes by.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.titleMicrobial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matteren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science & Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionPennsylvania State University, State College, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionWageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, Centre for Sustainable Water Technology, Leeuwarden, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Queensland, Brisbane, Australiaen
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