Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598754
Title:
Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory
Authors:
Gaffney, E.A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D.J.; Blake, J.R.; Kirkman-Brown, J.C.
Abstract:
Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.
Citation:
Gaffney EA, Gadêlha H, Smith DJ, Blake JR, Kirkman-Brown JC (2011) Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 43: 501–528. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-fluid-121108-145442.
Publisher:
Annual Reviews
Journal:
Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-C1-013-04
Issue Date:
21-Jan-2011
DOI:
10.1146/annurev-fluid-121108-145442
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0066-4189; 1545-4479
Sponsors:
EAG: This publication is based on work supported in part by Award KUK-C1-013-04, made byKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). H.G. acknowledges the CAPESFoundation for sponsorship under contract grant BEX-4676/06-8. D.J.S. acknowledges the MRCfor support under Special Training Fellowship G0600178; J.C.K.-B. and D.J.S. acknowledgesupport from Birmingham Science City, and previous support from the Wellcome Trust. Theauthors thank Dr. Nik Kapur of the University of Leeds for assistance with rheology and theReproductive Biology and Genetics Group, University of Birmingham, for valuable comments.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGaffney, E.A.en
dc.contributor.authorGadêlha, H.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, D.J.en
dc.contributor.authorBlake, J.R.en
dc.contributor.authorKirkman-Brown, J.C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:40:33Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:40:33Zen
dc.date.issued2011-01-21en
dc.identifier.citationGaffney EA, Gadêlha H, Smith DJ, Blake JR, Kirkman-Brown JC (2011) Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 43: 501–528. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-fluid-121108-145442.en
dc.identifier.issn0066-4189en
dc.identifier.issn1545-4479en
dc.identifier.doi10.1146/annurev-fluid-121108-145442en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598754en
dc.description.abstractMammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEAG: This publication is based on work supported in part by Award KUK-C1-013-04, made byKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). H.G. acknowledges the CAPESFoundation for sponsorship under contract grant BEX-4676/06-8. D.J.S. acknowledges the MRCfor support under Special Training Fellowship G0600178; J.C.K.-B. and D.J.S. acknowledgesupport from Birmingham Science City, and previous support from the Wellcome Trust. Theauthors thank Dr. Nik Kapur of the University of Leeds for assistance with rheology and theReproductive Biology and Genetics Group, University of Birmingham, for valuable comments.en
dc.publisherAnnual Reviewsen
dc.subjectflagellumen
dc.subjectfluid-filament interactionsen
dc.subjectmicroswimmeren
dc.subjectslender-body theoryen
dc.titleMammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theoryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnnual Review of Fluid Mechanicsen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionNHS Foundation Trust, Leeds, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionCAPES Foundation, Brasilia, Brazilen
dc.contributor.institutionThe University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdomen
kaust.grant.numberKUK-C1-013-04en
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