Layer-by-Layer-Assembled High-Performance Broadband Antireflection Coatings

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598708
Title:
Layer-by-Layer-Assembled High-Performance Broadband Antireflection Coatings
Authors:
Shimomura, Hiroomi; Gemici, Zekeriyya; Cohen, Robert E.; Rubner, Michael F.
Abstract:
Nanoparticles are indispensable ingredients of solution-processed optical, dielectric, and catalytic thin films. Although solution-based methods are promising low-cost alternatives to vacuum methods, they can have significant limitations. Coating uniformity, thickness control, roughness control, mechanical durability, and incorporation of a diverse set of functional organic molecules into nanoparticle thin films are major challenges. We have used the electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly technique to make uniform, conformal multistack nanoparticle thin films for optical applications with precise thickness control over each stack. Two particularly sought-after optical applications are broadband antireflection and structural color. The effects of interstack and surface roughness on optical properties of these constructs (e.g., haze and spectral response) have been studied quantitatively using a combination of Fourier-transform methods and atomic force microscopy measurements. Deconvoluting root-mean-square roughness into its large-, intermediate-, and small-scale components enables enhanced optical simulations. A 4-stack broadband antireflection coating (<0.5% average reflectance in the visible range, and 0.2% haze) composed of alternating high-index (n ≈ 1.96) and low-index (n ≈ 1.28) stacks has been made on glass substrate. Films calcinated at 550 °C endure a one-hour-long cloth cleaning test under 100 kPa normal stress. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
Shimomura H, Gemici Z, Cohen RE, Rubner MF (2010) Layer-by-Layer-Assembled High-Performance Broadband Antireflection Coatings. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2: 813–820. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/am900883f.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
KAUST Grant Number:
06/2008
Issue Date:
24-Mar-2010
DOI:
10.1021/am900883f
PubMed ID:
20356286
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1944-8244; 1944-8252
Sponsors:
We thank JSR Corporation and the MIT MRSEC program of the National Science Foundation (Grant DMR 03-13282) for funding; the Center for Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE) and the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN) for access to shared equipment facilities: Dr. Larry Domash of Agiltron Inc for optical modeling using the Needle algorithm. Z.G. thanks KAUST for fellowship support (beginning 06/2008).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShimomura, Hiroomien
dc.contributor.authorGemici, Zekeriyyaen
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Robert E.en
dc.contributor.authorRubner, Michael F.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:34:50Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:34:50Zen
dc.date.issued2010-03-24en
dc.identifier.citationShimomura H, Gemici Z, Cohen RE, Rubner MF (2010) Layer-by-Layer-Assembled High-Performance Broadband Antireflection Coatings. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2: 813–820. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/am900883f.en
dc.identifier.issn1944-8244en
dc.identifier.issn1944-8252en
dc.identifier.pmid20356286en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/am900883fen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598708en
dc.description.abstractNanoparticles are indispensable ingredients of solution-processed optical, dielectric, and catalytic thin films. Although solution-based methods are promising low-cost alternatives to vacuum methods, they can have significant limitations. Coating uniformity, thickness control, roughness control, mechanical durability, and incorporation of a diverse set of functional organic molecules into nanoparticle thin films are major challenges. We have used the electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly technique to make uniform, conformal multistack nanoparticle thin films for optical applications with precise thickness control over each stack. Two particularly sought-after optical applications are broadband antireflection and structural color. The effects of interstack and surface roughness on optical properties of these constructs (e.g., haze and spectral response) have been studied quantitatively using a combination of Fourier-transform methods and atomic force microscopy measurements. Deconvoluting root-mean-square roughness into its large-, intermediate-, and small-scale components enables enhanced optical simulations. A 4-stack broadband antireflection coating (<0.5% average reflectance in the visible range, and 0.2% haze) composed of alternating high-index (n ≈ 1.96) and low-index (n ≈ 1.28) stacks has been made on glass substrate. Films calcinated at 550 °C endure a one-hour-long cloth cleaning test under 100 kPa normal stress. © 2010 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank JSR Corporation and the MIT MRSEC program of the National Science Foundation (Grant DMR 03-13282) for funding; the Center for Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE) and the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN) for access to shared equipment facilities: Dr. Larry Domash of Agiltron Inc for optical modeling using the Needle algorithm. Z.G. thanks KAUST for fellowship support (beginning 06/2008).en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectAntireflectionen
dc.subjectBroadbanden
dc.subjectCoatingen
dc.subjectInterfaceen
dc.subjectLayer-by-layeren
dc.subjectNanoparticleen
dc.subjectRoughnessen
dc.titleLayer-by-Layer-Assembled High-Performance Broadband Antireflection Coatingsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalACS Applied Materials & Interfacesen
dc.contributor.institutionMassachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United Statesen
kaust.grant.number06/2008en

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