Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598539
Title:
Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells
Authors:
Selembo, Priscilla A.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Logan, Bruce E.
Abstract:
Although platinum is commonly used as catalyst on the cathode in microbial electrolysis cells (MEC), non-precious metal alternatives are needed to reduce costs. Cathodes were constructed using a nickel powder (0.5-1 μm) and their performance was compared to conventional electrodes containing Pt (0.002 μm) in MECs and electrochemical tests. The MEC performance in terms of coulombic efficiency, cathodic, hydrogen and energy recoveries were similar using Ni or Pt cathodes, although the maximum hydrogen production rate (Q) was slightly lower for Ni (Q = 1.2-1.3 m3 H2/m3/d; 0.6 V applied) than Pt (1.6 m3 H2/m3/d). Nickel dissolution was minimized by replacing medium in the reactor under anoxic conditions. The stability of the Ni particles was confirmed by examining the cathodes after 12 MEC cycles using scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry. Analysis of the anodic communities in these reactors revealed dominant populations of Geobacter sulfurreduces and Pelobacter propionicus. These results demonstrate that nickel powder can be used as a viable alternative to Pt in MECs, allowing large scale production of cathodes with similar performance to systems that use precious metal catalysts. © 2009 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu.
Citation:
Selembo PA, Merrill MD, Logan BE (2010) Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 35: 428–437. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2009.11.014.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
International Journal of Hydrogen Energy
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-003-13
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijhydene.2009.11.014
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0360-3199
Sponsors:
The authors thank R. Wagner, P. Kiely, T. Saito, M. Mehanna, S. Cheng and D. Jones for assistance with microbiology, electrochemistry and MEC experiments, and M.J. Janik, J.M. Perez and W.A. Lloyd for their advice and insight. This research was supported by Award KUS-I1-003-13 by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
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Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSelembo, Priscilla A.en
dc.contributor.authorMerrill, Matthew D.en
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:31:49Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:31:49Zen
dc.date.issued2010-01en
dc.identifier.citationSelembo PA, Merrill MD, Logan BE (2010) Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 35: 428–437. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2009.11.014.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-3199en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijhydene.2009.11.014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598539en
dc.description.abstractAlthough platinum is commonly used as catalyst on the cathode in microbial electrolysis cells (MEC), non-precious metal alternatives are needed to reduce costs. Cathodes were constructed using a nickel powder (0.5-1 μm) and their performance was compared to conventional electrodes containing Pt (0.002 μm) in MECs and electrochemical tests. The MEC performance in terms of coulombic efficiency, cathodic, hydrogen and energy recoveries were similar using Ni or Pt cathodes, although the maximum hydrogen production rate (Q) was slightly lower for Ni (Q = 1.2-1.3 m3 H2/m3/d; 0.6 V applied) than Pt (1.6 m3 H2/m3/d). Nickel dissolution was minimized by replacing medium in the reactor under anoxic conditions. The stability of the Ni particles was confirmed by examining the cathodes after 12 MEC cycles using scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry. Analysis of the anodic communities in these reactors revealed dominant populations of Geobacter sulfurreduces and Pelobacter propionicus. These results demonstrate that nickel powder can be used as a viable alternative to Pt in MECs, allowing large scale production of cathodes with similar performance to systems that use precious metal catalysts. © 2009 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank R. Wagner, P. Kiely, T. Saito, M. Mehanna, S. Cheng and D. Jones for assistance with microbiology, electrochemistry and MEC experiments, and M.J. Janik, J.M. Perez and W.A. Lloyd for their advice and insight. This research was supported by Award KUS-I1-003-13 by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectCathodeen
dc.subjectElectrohydrogenesisen
dc.subjectHydrogen productionen
dc.subjectMECen
dc.subjectMetalen
dc.subjectNickelen
dc.titleHydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energyen
dc.contributor.institutionPennsylvania State University, State College, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13en
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