Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598536
Title:
Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells
Authors:
Kim, Y.; Logan, B. E.
Abstract:
There is a tremendous source of entropic energy available from the salinity difference between river water and seawater, but this energy has yet to be efficiently captured and stored. Here we demonstrate that H(2) can be produced in a single process by capturing the salinity driven energy along with organic matter degradation using exoelectrogenic bacteria. Only five pairs of seawater and river water cells were sandwiched between an anode, containing exoelectrogenic bacteria, and a cathode, forming a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell. Exoelectrogens added an electrical potential from acetate oxidation and reduced the anode overpotential, while the reverse electrodialysis stack contributed 0.5-0.6 V at a salinity ratio (seawater:river water) of 50. The H(2) production rate increased from 0.8 to 1.6 m(3)-H(2)/m(3)-anolyte/day for seawater and river water flow rates ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 mL/ min. H(2) recovery, the ratio of electrons used for H(2) evolution to electrons released by substrate oxidation, ranged from 72% to 86%. Energy efficiencies, calculated from changes in salinities and the loss of organic matter, were 58% to 64%. By using a relatively small reverse electrodialysis stack (11 membranes), only ~1% of the produced energy was needed for pumping water. Although Pt was used on the cathode in these tests, additional tests with a nonprecious metal catalyst (MoS(2)) demonstrated H(2) production at a rate of 0.8 m(3)/m(3)/d and an energy efficiency of 51%. These results show that pure H(2) gas can efficiently be produced from virtually limitless supplies of seawater and river water, and biodegradable organic matter.
Citation:
Kim Y, Logan BE (2011) Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108: 16176–16181. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1106335108.
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Journal:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-003-13
Issue Date:
19-Sep-2011
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1106335108
PubMed ID:
21930953
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3182737
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0027-8424; 1091-6490
Sponsors:
This research was supported by funding through the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) (Award KUS-I1-003-13).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKim, Y.en
dc.contributor.authorLogan, B. E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:31:45Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:31:45Zen
dc.date.issued2011-09-19en
dc.identifier.citationKim Y, Logan BE (2011) Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108: 16176–16181. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1106335108.en
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490en
dc.identifier.pmid21930953en
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1106335108en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598536en
dc.description.abstractThere is a tremendous source of entropic energy available from the salinity difference between river water and seawater, but this energy has yet to be efficiently captured and stored. Here we demonstrate that H(2) can be produced in a single process by capturing the salinity driven energy along with organic matter degradation using exoelectrogenic bacteria. Only five pairs of seawater and river water cells were sandwiched between an anode, containing exoelectrogenic bacteria, and a cathode, forming a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell. Exoelectrogens added an electrical potential from acetate oxidation and reduced the anode overpotential, while the reverse electrodialysis stack contributed 0.5-0.6 V at a salinity ratio (seawater:river water) of 50. The H(2) production rate increased from 0.8 to 1.6 m(3)-H(2)/m(3)-anolyte/day for seawater and river water flow rates ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 mL/ min. H(2) recovery, the ratio of electrons used for H(2) evolution to electrons released by substrate oxidation, ranged from 72% to 86%. Energy efficiencies, calculated from changes in salinities and the loss of organic matter, were 58% to 64%. By using a relatively small reverse electrodialysis stack (11 membranes), only ~1% of the produced energy was needed for pumping water. Although Pt was used on the cathode in these tests, additional tests with a nonprecious metal catalyst (MoS(2)) demonstrated H(2) production at a rate of 0.8 m(3)/m(3)/d and an energy efficiency of 51%. These results show that pure H(2) gas can efficiently be produced from virtually limitless supplies of seawater and river water, and biodegradable organic matter.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by funding through the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) (Award KUS-I1-003-13).en
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen
dc.subjectElectrohydrogenesisen
dc.subjectMicrobial electrolysis cellen
dc.subjectMicrobial fuel cellen
dc.subjectRenewable energyen
dc.subjectSustainable energyen
dc.titleHydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3182737en
dc.contributor.institutionPennsylvania State University, State College, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13en
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