How pathogens use linear motifs to perturb host cell networks

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598519
Title:
How pathogens use linear motifs to perturb host cell networks
Authors:
Via, Allegra; Uyar, Bora; Brun, Christine; Zanzoni, Andreas
Abstract:
Molecular mimicry is one of the powerful stratagems that pathogens employ to colonise their hosts and take advantage of host cell functions to guarantee their replication and dissemination. In particular, several viruses have evolved the ability to interact with host cell components through protein short linear motifs (SLiMs) that mimic host SLiMs, thus facilitating their internalisation and the manipulation of a wide range of cellular networks. Here we present convincing evidence from the literature that motif mimicry also represents an effective, widespread hijacking strategy in prokaryotic and eukaryotic parasites. Further insights into host motif mimicry would be of great help in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind host cell invasion and the development of anti-infective therapeutic strategies.
Citation:
Via A, Uyar B, Brun C, Zanzoni A (2015) How pathogens use linear motifs to perturb host cell networks. Trends in Biochemical Sciences 40: 36–48. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tibs.2014.11.001.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Trends in Biochemical Sciences
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-I1-012-43
Issue Date:
Jan-2015
DOI:
10.1016/j.tibs.2014.11.001
PubMed ID:
25475989
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0968-0004
Sponsors:
The authors are grateful to David G. Biron (CNRS, France), Toby J. Gibson (EMBL, Germany), and Vincenzo Petrarca (Sapienza University, Italy) for critically reading the manuscript and providing fruitful suggestions. A.V. acknowledges the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Award No. KUK-I1-012-43 for funding support. C.B. and A.Z. received financial support from the French 'Plan Cancer 2009-2013' (Systems Biology call, A12171AS).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVia, Allegraen
dc.contributor.authorUyar, Boraen
dc.contributor.authorBrun, Christineen
dc.contributor.authorZanzoni, Andreasen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:31:27Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:31:27Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01en
dc.identifier.citationVia A, Uyar B, Brun C, Zanzoni A (2015) How pathogens use linear motifs to perturb host cell networks. Trends in Biochemical Sciences 40: 36–48. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tibs.2014.11.001.en
dc.identifier.issn0968-0004en
dc.identifier.pmid25475989en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tibs.2014.11.001en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598519en
dc.description.abstractMolecular mimicry is one of the powerful stratagems that pathogens employ to colonise their hosts and take advantage of host cell functions to guarantee their replication and dissemination. In particular, several viruses have evolved the ability to interact with host cell components through protein short linear motifs (SLiMs) that mimic host SLiMs, thus facilitating their internalisation and the manipulation of a wide range of cellular networks. Here we present convincing evidence from the literature that motif mimicry also represents an effective, widespread hijacking strategy in prokaryotic and eukaryotic parasites. Further insights into host motif mimicry would be of great help in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind host cell invasion and the development of anti-infective therapeutic strategies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors are grateful to David G. Biron (CNRS, France), Toby J. Gibson (EMBL, Germany), and Vincenzo Petrarca (Sapienza University, Italy) for critically reading the manuscript and providing fruitful suggestions. A.V. acknowledges the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Award No. KUK-I1-012-43 for funding support. C.B. and A.Z. received financial support from the French 'Plan Cancer 2009-2013' (Systems Biology call, A12171AS).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.titleHow pathogens use linear motifs to perturb host cell networksen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalTrends in Biochemical Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics, Sapienza University, 00185 Rome, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionStructural and Computational Biology, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionInserm, UMR1090 TAGC, Marseille F-13288, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionAix-Marseille Université, UMR1090 TAGC, Marseille F-13288, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionCNRS, Marseille F-13402, Franceen
kaust.grant.numberKUK-I1-012-43en

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