Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/598299
Title:
Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens
Authors:
Yates, Matthew D.; Cusick, Roland D.; Logan, Bruce E.
Abstract:
Sustainable methods are needed to recycle precious metals and synthesize catalytic nanoparticles. Palladium nanoparticles can be produced via microbial reduction of soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0), but in previous tests using dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB), the nanoparticles were closely associated with the cells, occupying potential reductive sites and eliminating the potential for cell reuse. The DMRB Geobacter sulfurreducens was shown here to reduce soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0) nanoparticles primarily outside the cell, reducing the toxicity of metal ions, and allowing nanoparticle recovery without cell destruction that has previously been observed using other microorganisms. Cultures reduced 50 ± 3 mg/L Pd(II) with 1% hydrogen gas (v/v headspace) in 6 h incubation tests [100 mg/L Pd(II) initially], compared to 8 ± 3 mg/L (10 mM acetate) without H2. Acetate was ineffective as an electron donor for palladium removal in the presence or absence of fumarate as an electron acceptor. TEM imaging verified that Pd(0) nanoparticles were predominantly in the EPS surrounding cells in H2-fed cultures, with only a small number of particles visible inside the cell. Separation of the cells and EPS by centrifugation allowed reuse of the cell suspensions and effective nanoparticle recovery. These results demonstrate effective palladium recovery and nanoparticle production using G. sulfurreducens cell suspensions and renewable substrates such as H2 gas. © 2013 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
Yates MD, Cusick RD, Logan BE (2013) Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens. ACS Sustainable Chem Eng 1: 1165–1171. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/sc4000785.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-003-13
Issue Date:
3-Sep-2013
DOI:
10.1021/sc4000785
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2168-0485; 2168-0485
Sponsors:
The authors would like to thank John Cantolina in the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences for his assistance with TEM imaging. This research was supported by Award KUS-I1-003-13 from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and by Award DGE-1255832 to M.D.Y. by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Student Fellowship Program.
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYates, Matthew D.en
dc.contributor.authorCusick, Roland D.en
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:18:15Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:18:15Zen
dc.date.issued2013-09-03en
dc.identifier.citationYates MD, Cusick RD, Logan BE (2013) Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens. ACS Sustainable Chem Eng 1: 1165–1171. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/sc4000785.en
dc.identifier.issn2168-0485en
dc.identifier.issn2168-0485en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/sc4000785en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/598299en
dc.description.abstractSustainable methods are needed to recycle precious metals and synthesize catalytic nanoparticles. Palladium nanoparticles can be produced via microbial reduction of soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0), but in previous tests using dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB), the nanoparticles were closely associated with the cells, occupying potential reductive sites and eliminating the potential for cell reuse. The DMRB Geobacter sulfurreducens was shown here to reduce soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0) nanoparticles primarily outside the cell, reducing the toxicity of metal ions, and allowing nanoparticle recovery without cell destruction that has previously been observed using other microorganisms. Cultures reduced 50 ± 3 mg/L Pd(II) with 1% hydrogen gas (v/v headspace) in 6 h incubation tests [100 mg/L Pd(II) initially], compared to 8 ± 3 mg/L (10 mM acetate) without H2. Acetate was ineffective as an electron donor for palladium removal in the presence or absence of fumarate as an electron acceptor. TEM imaging verified that Pd(0) nanoparticles were predominantly in the EPS surrounding cells in H2-fed cultures, with only a small number of particles visible inside the cell. Separation of the cells and EPS by centrifugation allowed reuse of the cell suspensions and effective nanoparticle recovery. These results demonstrate effective palladium recovery and nanoparticle production using G. sulfurreducens cell suspensions and renewable substrates such as H2 gas. © 2013 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank John Cantolina in the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences for his assistance with TEM imaging. This research was supported by Award KUS-I1-003-13 from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and by Award DGE-1255832 to M.D.Y. by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Student Fellowship Program.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectBiosynthesisen
dc.subjectGeobacteren
dc.subjectNanoparticlesen
dc.subjectSustainableen
dc.titleExtracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducensen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineeringen
dc.contributor.institutionPennsylvania State University, State College, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13en
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