Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/597881
Title:
Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells
Authors:
Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E.
Abstract:
Non-corrosive, carbon-based materials are usually used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In some cases, however, metals have been used that can corrode (e.g. copper) or that are corrosion resistant (e.g. stainless steel, SS). Corrosion could increase current through galvanic (abiotic) current production or by increasing exposed surface area, or decrease current due to generation of toxic products from corrosion. In order to directly examine the effects of using corrodible metal anodes, MFCs with Cu were compared with reactors using SS and carbon cloth anodes. MFCs with Cu anodes initially showed high current generation similar to abiotic controls, but subsequently they produced little power (2 mW m-2). Higher power was produced with microbes using SS (12 mW m-2) or carbon cloth (880 mW m-2) anodes, with no power generated by abiotic controls. These results demonstrate that copper is an unsuitable anode material, due to corrosion and likely copper toxicity to microorganisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.
Citation:
Zhu X, Logan BE (2013) Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology 89: 471–474. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jctb.4156.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-003-13
Issue Date:
16-Jul-2013
DOI:
10.1002/jctb.4156
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0268-2575
Sponsors:
The authors acknowledge support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) by Award KUS-I1-003-13. We thank Mike Greenwald for help in Cu<SUP>2+</SUP> measurement using atomic absorption flame emission spectrophotometry.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Xiupingen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T12:58:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T12:58:16Zen
dc.date.issued2013-07-16en
dc.identifier.citationZhu X, Logan BE (2013) Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology 89: 471–474. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jctb.4156.en
dc.identifier.issn0268-2575en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jctb.4156en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/597881en
dc.description.abstractNon-corrosive, carbon-based materials are usually used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In some cases, however, metals have been used that can corrode (e.g. copper) or that are corrosion resistant (e.g. stainless steel, SS). Corrosion could increase current through galvanic (abiotic) current production or by increasing exposed surface area, or decrease current due to generation of toxic products from corrosion. In order to directly examine the effects of using corrodible metal anodes, MFCs with Cu were compared with reactors using SS and carbon cloth anodes. MFCs with Cu anodes initially showed high current generation similar to abiotic controls, but subsequently they produced little power (2 mW m-2). Higher power was produced with microbes using SS (12 mW m-2) or carbon cloth (880 mW m-2) anodes, with no power generated by abiotic controls. These results demonstrate that copper is an unsuitable anode material, due to corrosion and likely copper toxicity to microorganisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) by Award KUS-I1-003-13. We thank Mike Greenwald for help in Cu<SUP>2+</SUP> measurement using atomic absorption flame emission spectrophotometry.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjectCarbon cloth anodeen
dc.subjectCopper anodeen
dc.subjectMicrobial fuel cellen
dc.subjectStainless steel anodeen
dc.titleCopper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Penn State University; USAen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13en
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