Changing composition of microbial communities indicates seepage fluid difference of the Thuwal Seeps in the Red Sea

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/597752
Title:
Changing composition of microbial communities indicates seepage fluid difference of the Thuwal Seeps in the Red Sea
Authors:
Yang, Bo; Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Renmao; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan
Abstract:
© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. Cold seeps are unique ecosystems that are generally characterized by high salinity and reducing solutions. Seepage fluid, the major water influx of this system, contains hypersaline water, sediment pore water, and other components. The Thuwal cold seeps were recently discovered on the continental margin of the Red Sea. Using 16S rRNA gene pyro-sequencing technology, microbial communities were investigated by comparing samples collected in 2011 and 2013. The results revealed differences in the microbial communities between the two sampling times. In particular, a significantly higher abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota was coupled with lower salinity in 2013. In the brine pool, the dominance of Desulfobacterales in 2011 was supplanted byMGI Thaumarchaeota in 2013, perhaps due to a reduced supply of hydrogen sulfide from the seepage fluid. Collectively, this study revealed a difference in water components in this ecosystem between two sampling times. The results indicated that the seawater in this cold seep displayed a greater number of characteristics of normal seawater in 2013 than in 2011, which might represent the dominant driving force for changes in microbial community structures. This is the first study to provide a temporal comparison of the microbial biodiversity of a cold seep ecosystem in the Red Sea.
Citation:
Yang B, Zhang W, Tian R, Wang Y, Qian P-Y (2015) Changing composition of microbial communities indicates seepage fluid difference of the Thuwal Seeps in the Red Sea. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 108: 461–471. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10482-015-0499-y.
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek
Issue Date:
10-Jun-2015
DOI:
10.1007/s10482-015-0499-y
PubMed ID:
26059861
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0003-6072; 1572-9699
Sponsors:
The authors are grateful to the crew members of R/V Aegaeo and Dr Abdulaziz Al-Suwailem and his team from Coastal and Marine Resources Core Laboratory from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for providing technical assistance during the sample collection. This study was supported by grants from the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, No: 2012CB417304) and the China Ocean Mineral Resources R & D Association (COMRA) (DY125-15-R-01) as well as by a Global Collaborative Research Award from KAUST to Pei-Yuan Qian.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYang, Boen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Weipengen
dc.contributor.authorTian, Renmaoen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yongen
dc.contributor.authorQian, Pei-Yuanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T12:56:05Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T12:56:05Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-10en
dc.identifier.citationYang B, Zhang W, Tian R, Wang Y, Qian P-Y (2015) Changing composition of microbial communities indicates seepage fluid difference of the Thuwal Seeps in the Red Sea. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 108: 461–471. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10482-015-0499-y.en
dc.identifier.issn0003-6072en
dc.identifier.issn1572-9699en
dc.identifier.pmid26059861en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10482-015-0499-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/597752en
dc.description.abstract© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. Cold seeps are unique ecosystems that are generally characterized by high salinity and reducing solutions. Seepage fluid, the major water influx of this system, contains hypersaline water, sediment pore water, and other components. The Thuwal cold seeps were recently discovered on the continental margin of the Red Sea. Using 16S rRNA gene pyro-sequencing technology, microbial communities were investigated by comparing samples collected in 2011 and 2013. The results revealed differences in the microbial communities between the two sampling times. In particular, a significantly higher abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota was coupled with lower salinity in 2013. In the brine pool, the dominance of Desulfobacterales in 2011 was supplanted byMGI Thaumarchaeota in 2013, perhaps due to a reduced supply of hydrogen sulfide from the seepage fluid. Collectively, this study revealed a difference in water components in this ecosystem between two sampling times. The results indicated that the seawater in this cold seep displayed a greater number of characteristics of normal seawater in 2013 than in 2011, which might represent the dominant driving force for changes in microbial community structures. This is the first study to provide a temporal comparison of the microbial biodiversity of a cold seep ecosystem in the Red Sea.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors are grateful to the crew members of R/V Aegaeo and Dr Abdulaziz Al-Suwailem and his team from Coastal and Marine Resources Core Laboratory from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for providing technical assistance during the sample collection. This study was supported by grants from the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, No: 2012CB417304) and the China Ocean Mineral Resources R & D Association (COMRA) (DY125-15-R-01) as well as by a Global Collaborative Research Award from KAUST to Pei-Yuan Qian.en
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.subjectCold seepen
dc.subjectMicrobial communityen
dc.subjectRed Seaen
dc.subjectSeepage differenceen
dc.titleChanging composition of microbial communities indicates seepage fluid difference of the Thuwal Seeps in the Red Seaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAntonie van Leeuwenhoeken
dc.contributor.institutionHong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionChinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Chinaen

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