Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/597586
Title:
Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean
Authors:
Regnier, Pierre; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ciais, Philippe; Mackenzie, Fred T.; Gruber, Nicolas; Janssens, Ivan A.; Laruelle, Goulven G.; Lauerwald, Ronny; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Andersson, Andreas J.; Arndt, Sandra; Arnosti, Carol; Borges, Alberto V.; Dale, Andrew W.; Gallego-Sala, Angela; Goddéris, Yves; Goossens, Nicolas; Hartmann, Jens; Heinze, Christoph; Ilyina, Tatiana; Joos, Fortunat; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Leifeld, Jens; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Munhoven, Guy; Raymond, Peter A.; Spahni, Renato; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Thullner, Martin
Abstract:
A substantial amount of the atmospheric carbon taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally along the aquatic continuum from upland terrestrial ecosystems to the ocean. So far, global carbon budget estimates have implicitly assumed that the transformation and lateral transport of carbon along this aquatic continuum has remained unchanged since pre-industrial times. A synthesis of published work reveals the magnitude of present-day lateral carbon fluxes from land to ocean, and the extent to which human activities have altered these fluxes. We show that anthropogenic perturbation may have increased the flux of carbon to inland waters by as much as 1.0 Pg C yr -1 since pre-industrial times, mainly owing to enhanced carbon export from soils. Most of this additional carbon input to upstream rivers is either emitted back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (∼0.4 Pg C yr -1) or sequestered in sediments (∼0.5 Pg C yr -1) along the continuum of freshwater bodies, estuaries and coastal waters, leaving only a perturbation carbon input of ∼0.1 Pg C yr -1 to the open ocean. According to our analysis, terrestrial ecosystems store ∼0.9 Pg C yr -1 at present, which is in agreement with results from forest inventories but significantly differs from the figure of 1.5 Pg C yr -1 previously estimated when ignoring changes in lateral carbon fluxes. We suggest that carbon fluxes along the land-ocean aquatic continuum need to be included in global carbon dioxide budgets.
Citation:
Regnier P, Friedlingstein P, Ciais P, Mackenzie FT, Gruber N, et al. (2013) Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean. Nature Geosci 6: 597–607. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/NGEO1830.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Nature Geoscience
Issue Date:
9-Jun-2013
DOI:
10.1038/NGEO1830
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1752-0894; 1752-0908
Sponsors:
This paper is the outcome of the workshop 'Exploring knowledge gaps along the global carbon route: a hitchhiker's guide for a boundless cycle' held in Eprave, Belgium, in November 2011. The authors would like to thank S. Bonneville, L. Chou, P. Cox, H. Durr, T. Eglinton, K. Fleischer, J. Kaplan, T. Kleinen, D. Dan Li, A. Mouchet, H. Nick, C. Pallud, C. Prentice, D. Schimel, M. Serrano, J-L. Tison, P. Van Cappellen, C. Volta and J. Zhou for their input during the workshop. The workshop was officially endorsed by the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and by the Analysis, Integration and Modeling of the Earth System (AIMES) of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and received financial support from the government of the Brussels-Capital region (Innoviris - Brains Back to Brussels award to P. R.), the Walloon Agency for Air and Climate (AWAC), the Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique of Belgium (FNRS), The Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), the Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium), the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Center-in-Development Award to Utrecht University (The Netherlands), the University of Waterloo (Canada) and the University of Exeter (UK). The research leading to these results received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement number 283080, project GEOCARBON.
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DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRegnier, Pierreen
dc.contributor.authorFriedlingstein, Pierreen
dc.contributor.authorCiais, Philippeen
dc.contributor.authorMackenzie, Fred T.en
dc.contributor.authorGruber, Nicolasen
dc.contributor.authorJanssens, Ivan A.en
dc.contributor.authorLaruelle, Goulven G.en
dc.contributor.authorLauerwald, Ronnyen
dc.contributor.authorLuyssaert, Sebastiaanen
dc.contributor.authorAndersson, Andreas J.en
dc.contributor.authorArndt, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorArnosti, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorBorges, Alberto V.en
dc.contributor.authorDale, Andrew W.en
dc.contributor.authorGallego-Sala, Angelaen
dc.contributor.authorGoddéris, Yvesen
dc.contributor.authorGoossens, Nicolasen
dc.contributor.authorHartmann, Jensen
dc.contributor.authorHeinze, Christophen
dc.contributor.authorIlyina, Tatianaen
dc.contributor.authorJoos, Fortunaten
dc.contributor.authorLaRowe, Douglas E.en
dc.contributor.authorLeifeld, Jensen
dc.contributor.authorMeysman, Filip J. R.en
dc.contributor.authorMunhoven, Guyen
dc.contributor.authorRaymond, Peter A.en
dc.contributor.authorSpahni, Renatoen
dc.contributor.authorSuntharalingam, Parvadhaen
dc.contributor.authorThullner, Martinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T12:42:35Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T12:42:35Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06-09en
dc.identifier.citationRegnier P, Friedlingstein P, Ciais P, Mackenzie FT, Gruber N, et al. (2013) Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean. Nature Geosci 6: 597–607. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/NGEO1830.en
dc.identifier.issn1752-0894en
dc.identifier.issn1752-0908en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/NGEO1830en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/597586en
dc.description.abstractA substantial amount of the atmospheric carbon taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally along the aquatic continuum from upland terrestrial ecosystems to the ocean. So far, global carbon budget estimates have implicitly assumed that the transformation and lateral transport of carbon along this aquatic continuum has remained unchanged since pre-industrial times. A synthesis of published work reveals the magnitude of present-day lateral carbon fluxes from land to ocean, and the extent to which human activities have altered these fluxes. We show that anthropogenic perturbation may have increased the flux of carbon to inland waters by as much as 1.0 Pg C yr -1 since pre-industrial times, mainly owing to enhanced carbon export from soils. Most of this additional carbon input to upstream rivers is either emitted back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (∼0.4 Pg C yr -1) or sequestered in sediments (∼0.5 Pg C yr -1) along the continuum of freshwater bodies, estuaries and coastal waters, leaving only a perturbation carbon input of ∼0.1 Pg C yr -1 to the open ocean. According to our analysis, terrestrial ecosystems store ∼0.9 Pg C yr -1 at present, which is in agreement with results from forest inventories but significantly differs from the figure of 1.5 Pg C yr -1 previously estimated when ignoring changes in lateral carbon fluxes. We suggest that carbon fluxes along the land-ocean aquatic continuum need to be included in global carbon dioxide budgets.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper is the outcome of the workshop 'Exploring knowledge gaps along the global carbon route: a hitchhiker's guide for a boundless cycle' held in Eprave, Belgium, in November 2011. The authors would like to thank S. Bonneville, L. Chou, P. Cox, H. Durr, T. Eglinton, K. Fleischer, J. Kaplan, T. Kleinen, D. Dan Li, A. Mouchet, H. Nick, C. Pallud, C. Prentice, D. Schimel, M. Serrano, J-L. Tison, P. Van Cappellen, C. Volta and J. Zhou for their input during the workshop. The workshop was officially endorsed by the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and by the Analysis, Integration and Modeling of the Earth System (AIMES) of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and received financial support from the government of the Brussels-Capital region (Innoviris - Brains Back to Brussels award to P. R.), the Walloon Agency for Air and Climate (AWAC), the Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique of Belgium (FNRS), The Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), the Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium), the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Center-in-Development Award to Utrecht University (The Netherlands), the University of Waterloo (Canada) and the University of Exeter (UK). The research leading to these results received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement number 283080, project GEOCARBON.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.titleAnthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to oceanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNature Geoscienceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversité libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire des Sciences du Climat et l'Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionEidgenossische Technische Hochschule Zurich, Zurich, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionUniversiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Biogeochemistry and Marine Chemistry, Hamburg, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionScripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionThe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversite de Liege, Liege, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.institutionGEOMAR - Helmholtz Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel, Kiel, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversite Paul Sabatier Toulouse III, Toulouse, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversitetet i Bergen, Bergen, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionBjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionUni Research, Bergen, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionMax Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversitat Bern, Bern, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Southern California, Los Angeles, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionForschungsanstalt Agroscope Reckenholz-Tanikon, Zurich, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionRoyal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research - NIOZ, 't Horntje, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionVrije Universiteit Brussel, Elsene, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.institutionYale University, New Haven, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionHelmholtz Zentrum f?r Umweltforschung, Leipzig, Germanyen
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