Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596862
Title:
Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production
Authors:
Belila, Abdelaziz; El Chakhtoura, Joline; Otaibi, N.; Muyzer, G.; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Saikaly, Pascal ( 0000-0001-7678-3986 ) ; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M. ( 0000-0003-0658-4775 ) ; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
Microbial processes inevitably play a role in membrane-based desalination plants, mainly recognized as membrane biofouling. We assessed the bacterial community structure and diversity during different treatment steps in a full-scale seawater desalination plant producing 40,000 m3/d of drinking water. Water samples were taken over the full treatment train consisting of chlorination, spruce media and cartridge filters, de-chlorination, first and second pass reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and final chlorine dosage for drinking water distribution. The water samples were analyzed for water quality parameters (total bacterial cell number, total organic carbon, conductivity, pH, etc.) and microbial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The planktonic microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (48.6%) followed by Bacteroidetes (15%), Firmicutes (9.3%) and Cyanobacteria (4.9%). During the pretreatment step, the spruce media filter did not impact the bacterial community composition dominated by Proteobacteria. In contrast, the RO and final chlorination treatment steps reduced the Proteobacterial relative abundance in the produced water where Firmicutes constituted the most dominant bacterial group. Shannon and Chao1 diversity indices showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit some bacterial DNA was found in the water after RO filtration. About 0.25% of the total bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in all stages of the desalination plant: the seawater, the RO permeates and the chlorinated drinking water, suggesting that these bacterial strains can survive in different environments such as high/low salt concentration and with/without residual disinfectant. These bacterial strains were not caused by contamination during water sample filtration or from DNA extraction protocols. Control measurements for sample contamination are important for clean water studies.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production 2016 Water Research
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
18-Feb-2016
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2016.02.039
PubMed ID:
26925544
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Sponsors:
This publication is based upon work supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds (OCRF) under Award No. URF/1/1728-01-01 and Evides Waterbedrijf. Special thanks to all KAUST desalination plant staff for their technical assistance and to Noreddine Ghaffour and Qingyu Li for providing water quality data and discussions.
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0043135416300987
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBelila, Abdelazizen
dc.contributor.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
dc.contributor.authorOtaibi, N.en
dc.contributor.authorMuyzer, G.en
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Gil, Gracielaen
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, M.C.M.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T14:23:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T14:23:56Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-18en
dc.identifier.citationBacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production 2016 Water Researchen
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.pmid26925544-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2016.02.039en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596862en
dc.description.abstractMicrobial processes inevitably play a role in membrane-based desalination plants, mainly recognized as membrane biofouling. We assessed the bacterial community structure and diversity during different treatment steps in a full-scale seawater desalination plant producing 40,000 m3/d of drinking water. Water samples were taken over the full treatment train consisting of chlorination, spruce media and cartridge filters, de-chlorination, first and second pass reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and final chlorine dosage for drinking water distribution. The water samples were analyzed for water quality parameters (total bacterial cell number, total organic carbon, conductivity, pH, etc.) and microbial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The planktonic microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (48.6%) followed by Bacteroidetes (15%), Firmicutes (9.3%) and Cyanobacteria (4.9%). During the pretreatment step, the spruce media filter did not impact the bacterial community composition dominated by Proteobacteria. In contrast, the RO and final chlorination treatment steps reduced the Proteobacterial relative abundance in the produced water where Firmicutes constituted the most dominant bacterial group. Shannon and Chao1 diversity indices showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit some bacterial DNA was found in the water after RO filtration. About 0.25% of the total bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in all stages of the desalination plant: the seawater, the RO permeates and the chlorinated drinking water, suggesting that these bacterial strains can survive in different environments such as high/low salt concentration and with/without residual disinfectant. These bacterial strains were not caused by contamination during water sample filtration or from DNA extraction protocols. Control measurements for sample contamination are important for clean water studies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis publication is based upon work supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds (OCRF) under Award No. URF/1/1728-01-01 and Evides Waterbedrijf. Special thanks to all KAUST desalination plant staff for their technical assistance and to Noreddine Ghaffour and Qingyu Li for providing water quality data and discussions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0043135416300987en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Water Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Water Research, 18 February 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2016.02.039en
dc.subject16S rRNA gene pyrosequencingen
dc.subjectbacterial populationen
dc.subjectsample contamination controlen
dc.subjectseawater desalinationen
dc.subjectreverse osmosisen
dc.subjectmembrane based drinking water productionen
dc.titleBacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water productionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft, The Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Aquatic Microbiology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, European Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Oostergoweg 9, 8911 MA Leeuwarden, The Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorBelila, Abdelazizen
kaust.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
kaust.authorOtaibi, N.en
kaust.authorGonzalez-Gil, Gracielaen
kaust.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en

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