Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis and Chemical-Production Cell for H2 Production and CO2 Sequestration.

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596844
Title:
Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis and Chemical-Production Cell for H2 Production and CO2 Sequestration.
Authors:
Zhu, Xiuping; Hatzell, Marta C; Logan, Bruce E
Abstract:
Natural mineral carbonation can be accelerated using acid and alkali solutions to enhance atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the production of these solutions needs to be carbon-neutral. A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis and chemical-production cell (MRECC) was developed to produce these solutions and H2 gas using only renewable energy sources (organic matter and salinity gradient). Using acetate (0.82 g/L) as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber (liquid volume of 28 mL), 0.45 mmol of acid and 1.09 mmol of alkali were produced at production efficiencies of 35% and 86%, respectively, along with 10 mL of H2 gas. Serpentine dissolution was enhanced 17-87-fold using the acid solution, with approximately 9 mL of CO2 absorbed and 4 mg of CO2 fixed as magnesium or calcium carbonates. The operational costs, based on mineral digging and grinding, and water pumping, were estimated to be only $25/metric ton of CO2 fixed as insoluble carbonates. Considering the additional economic benefits of H2 generation and possible wastewater treatment, this method may be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for CO2 sequestration.
Citation:
Zhu X, Hatzell MC, Logan BE (2014) Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis and Chemical-Production Cell for H 2 Production and CO 2 Sequestration . Environ Sci Technol Lett 1: 231–235. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ez500073q.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Environmental Science & Technology Letters
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-11-003-13
Issue Date:
24-Mar-2014
DOI:
10.1021/ez500073q
PubMed ID:
24741666
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3982931
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2328-8930; 2328-8930
Sponsors:
This research was supported by Award KUS-11-003-13 from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We thank Dr. George Alexander from the Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering of The Pennsylvania State University for providing natural minerals.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Xiupingen
dc.contributor.authorHatzell, Marta Cen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce Een
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T09:35:14Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T09:35:14Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03-24en
dc.identifier.citationZhu X, Hatzell MC, Logan BE (2014) Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis and Chemical-Production Cell for H 2 Production and CO 2 Sequestration . Environ Sci Technol Lett 1: 231–235. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ez500073q.en
dc.identifier.issn2328-8930en
dc.identifier.issn2328-8930en
dc.identifier.pmid24741666en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/ez500073qen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596844en
dc.description.abstractNatural mineral carbonation can be accelerated using acid and alkali solutions to enhance atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the production of these solutions needs to be carbon-neutral. A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis and chemical-production cell (MRECC) was developed to produce these solutions and H2 gas using only renewable energy sources (organic matter and salinity gradient). Using acetate (0.82 g/L) as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber (liquid volume of 28 mL), 0.45 mmol of acid and 1.09 mmol of alkali were produced at production efficiencies of 35% and 86%, respectively, along with 10 mL of H2 gas. Serpentine dissolution was enhanced 17-87-fold using the acid solution, with approximately 9 mL of CO2 absorbed and 4 mg of CO2 fixed as magnesium or calcium carbonates. The operational costs, based on mineral digging and grinding, and water pumping, were estimated to be only $25/metric ton of CO2 fixed as insoluble carbonates. Considering the additional economic benefits of H2 generation and possible wastewater treatment, this method may be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for CO2 sequestration.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by Award KUS-11-003-13 from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We thank Dr. George Alexander from the Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering of The Pennsylvania State University for providing natural minerals.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.en
dc.rights.urihttp://pubs.acs.org/page/policy/authorchoice_termsofuse.htmlen
dc.titleMicrobial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis and Chemical-Production Cell for H2 Production and CO2 Sequestration.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science & Technology Lettersen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3982931en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University , University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, United States.en
kaust.grant.numberKUS-11-003-13en
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