The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596824
Title:
The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.
Authors:
Siegert, Michael; Li, Xiu-Fen; Yates, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E
Abstract:
High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.
Citation:
Siegert M, Li X-F, Yates MD, Logan BE (2015) The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells. Frontiers in Microbiology 5. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2014.00778.
Publisher:
Frontiers Media SA
Journal:
Frontiers in Microbiology
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-003-13
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2014
DOI:
10.3389/fmicb.2014.00778
PubMed ID:
25642216
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4295556
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1664-302X
Sponsors:
This research was supported by the Global Climate and Energy Program (GCEP) and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST, award KUS-I1-003-13).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSiegert, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xiu-Fenen
dc.contributor.authorYates, Matthew Den
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce Een
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T08:51:22Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T08:51:22Zen
dc.date.issued2014-01-01en
dc.identifier.citationSiegert M, Li X-F, Yates MD, Logan BE (2015) The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells. Frontiers in Microbiology 5. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2014.00778.en
dc.identifier.issn1664-302Xen
dc.identifier.pmid25642216en
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2014.00778en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596824en
dc.description.abstractHigh current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the Global Climate and Energy Program (GCEP) and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST, award KUS-I1-003-13).en
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectMethanobacteriumen
dc.subjectGeobacteren
dc.subjectMicrobially Influenced Corrosionen
dc.subjectBiocathodeen
dc.subjectMethanobrevibacteren
dc.subjectPower-to-gasen
dc.subjectElectromethanogenesisen
dc.subjectBog Sedimenten
dc.titleThe presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Microbiologyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4295556en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Penn State University University Park, PA, USA.en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Environmental and Civil Engineering, Jiangnan University Wuxi, China.en
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13en
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