Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596819
Title:
Superconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales.
Authors:
Setu, Siti Aminah; Dullens, Roel P A; Hernández-Machado, Aurora; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo
Abstract:
Understanding fluid dynamics under extreme confinement, where device and intrinsic fluid length scales become comparable, is essential to successfully develop the coming generations of fluidic devices. Here we report measurements of advancing fluid fronts in such a regime, which we dub superconfinement. We find that the strong coupling between contact-line friction and geometric confinement gives rise to a new stability regime where the maximum speed for a stable moving front exhibits a distinctive response to changes in the bounding geometry. Unstable fronts develop into drop-emitting jets controlled by thermal fluctuations. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics in superconfined systems is dominated by interfacial forces. Henceforth, we present a theory that quantifies our experiments in terms of the relevant interfacial length scale, which in our system is the intrinsic contact-line slip length. Our findings show that length-scale overlap can be used as a new fluid-control mechanism in strongly confined systems.
Citation:
Setu SA, Dullens RPA, Hernández-Machado A, Pagonabarraga I, Aarts DGAL, et al. (2015) Superconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales. Nat Comms 6: 7297. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms8297.
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Nature Communications
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-C1-013-04
Issue Date:
15-Jun-2015
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms8297
PubMed ID:
26073752
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4490407
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2041-1723
Sponsors:
We are indebted to Denis Bartolo for a critical reading of this manuscript. R.L.-A. thanks Sumesh Thampi for useful discussions, and Somerville College (Fulford Fellowships), Marie Curie Actions (FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2010 no. 273406) and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) award no. KUK-C1-013-04 for financial support. A.H.-M. acknowledges partial support from MINECO (Spain) under project FIS 2013-47949-C2-1-P and DURSI 2014 SGR878. I.P. acknowledges financial support from MINECO (Spain) and DURSI under projects FIS2011-22603 and 2009SGR-634, respectively. S.A.S. acknowledges financial support from Ministry of Higher Education Malaysia (MOHE) and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), and D.G.A.L.A. from EPSRC grant EP/H035362/1.
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSetu, Siti Aminahen
dc.contributor.authorDullens, Roel P Aen
dc.contributor.authorHernández-Machado, Auroraen
dc.contributor.authorPagonabarraga, Ignacioen
dc.contributor.authorAarts, Dirk G A Len
dc.contributor.authorLedesma-Aguilar, Rodrigoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T08:51:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T08:51:17Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-15en
dc.identifier.citationSetu SA, Dullens RPA, Hernández-Machado A, Pagonabarraga I, Aarts DGAL, et al. (2015) Superconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales. Nat Comms 6: 7297. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms8297.en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en
dc.identifier.pmid26073752en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms8297en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596819en
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding fluid dynamics under extreme confinement, where device and intrinsic fluid length scales become comparable, is essential to successfully develop the coming generations of fluidic devices. Here we report measurements of advancing fluid fronts in such a regime, which we dub superconfinement. We find that the strong coupling between contact-line friction and geometric confinement gives rise to a new stability regime where the maximum speed for a stable moving front exhibits a distinctive response to changes in the bounding geometry. Unstable fronts develop into drop-emitting jets controlled by thermal fluctuations. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics in superconfined systems is dominated by interfacial forces. Henceforth, we present a theory that quantifies our experiments in terms of the relevant interfacial length scale, which in our system is the intrinsic contact-line slip length. Our findings show that length-scale overlap can be used as a new fluid-control mechanism in strongly confined systems.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are indebted to Denis Bartolo for a critical reading of this manuscript. R.L.-A. thanks Sumesh Thampi for useful discussions, and Somerville College (Fulford Fellowships), Marie Curie Actions (FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2010 no. 273406) and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) award no. KUK-C1-013-04 for financial support. A.H.-M. acknowledges partial support from MINECO (Spain) under project FIS 2013-47949-C2-1-P and DURSI 2014 SGR878. I.P. acknowledges financial support from MINECO (Spain) and DURSI under projects FIS2011-22603 and 2009SGR-634, respectively. S.A.S. acknowledges financial support from Ministry of Higher Education Malaysia (MOHE) and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), and D.G.A.L.A. from EPSRC grant EP/H035362/1.en
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visiten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleSuperconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4490407en
dc.contributor.institution1] Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ, UK [2] Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Johor 81310, Malaysia.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria, Universitat de Barcelona, C. Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona E-08028, Spain.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, C. Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona E-08028, Spain.en
dc.contributor.institution1] The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP, UK [2] Oxford Centre for Collaborative Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK [3] Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Northumbria University, Ellison Place, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK.en
kaust.grant.numberKUK-C1-013-04en

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