Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596804
Title:
Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?
Authors:
Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J
Abstract:
Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.
Citation:
Balk M, Laverman AM, Keuskamp JA, Laanbroek HJ (2015) Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite? Frontiers in Microbiology 6. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2015.00166.
Publisher:
Frontiers Media SA
Journal:
Frontiers in Microbiology
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-C1-017-12
Issue Date:
2-Mar-2015
DOI:
10.3389/fmicb.2015.00166
PubMed ID:
25784903
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4345912
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1664-302X
Sponsors:
We like to acknowledge Mariet Hefting, Jos Verhoeven, and Dennis Whigham for their help in collecting the mangrove soil samples. We also want to thank Pieter Kleingeld for his technical assistance with the flow-through reactors, and Yamini Satyawali and Winnie Dejonghe from the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) in Belgium for the analyses of total organic carbon and mean soil particle size. The study was supported by the Center-in-Development Award to Utrecht University (KUK-C1-017-12) made available by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, and by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)/SRON User Support Program Planetary Science (Project no. ALW-Geo-PL/10). This is publication number 2015 of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and publication number 983 of the Smithsonian Marine Station.
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBalk, Melikeen
dc.contributor.authorLaverman, Anniet Men
dc.contributor.authorKeuskamp, Joost Aen
dc.contributor.authorLaanbroek, Hendrikus Jen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T08:51:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T08:51:00Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-02en
dc.identifier.citationBalk M, Laverman AM, Keuskamp JA, Laanbroek HJ (2015) Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite? Frontiers in Microbiology 6. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2015.00166.en
dc.identifier.issn1664-302Xen
dc.identifier.pmid25784903en
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2015.00166en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596804en
dc.description.abstractNitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe like to acknowledge Mariet Hefting, Jos Verhoeven, and Dennis Whigham for their help in collecting the mangrove soil samples. We also want to thank Pieter Kleingeld for his technical assistance with the flow-through reactors, and Yamini Satyawali and Winnie Dejonghe from the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) in Belgium for the analyses of total organic carbon and mean soil particle size. The study was supported by the Center-in-Development Award to Utrecht University (KUK-C1-017-12) made available by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, and by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)/SRON User Support Program Planetary Science (Project no. ALW-Geo-PL/10). This is publication number 2015 of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and publication number 983 of the Smithsonian Marine Station.en
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectNitrate Reductionen
dc.subjectAmmonium Productionen
dc.subjectNitrite Productionen
dc.subjectMangrove Soilen
dc.titleNitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Microbiologyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4345912en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) Netherlands ; Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University Utrecht, Netherlands.en
dc.contributor.institutionCNRS EcoBio UMR6553, Université Rennes 1 Rennes, France.en
dc.contributor.institutionEcology and Biodiversity Group, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University Utrecht, Netherlands.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) Netherlands ; Ecology and Biodiversity Group, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University Utrecht, Netherlands.en
kaust.grant.numberKUK-C1-017-12en

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