How linear features alter predator movement and the functional response.

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596790
Title:
How linear features alter predator movement and the functional response.
Authors:
McKenzie, Hannah W; Merrill, Evelyn H; Spiteri, Raymond J; Lewis, Mark A
Abstract:
In areas of oil and gas exploration, seismic lines have been reported to alter the movement patterns of wolves (Canis lupus). We developed a mechanistic first passage time model, based on an anisotropic elliptic partial differential equation, and used this to explore how wolf movement responses to seismic lines influence the encounter rate of the wolves with their prey. The model was parametrized using 5 min GPS location data. These data showed that wolves travelled faster on seismic lines and had a higher probability of staying on a seismic line once they were on it. We simulated wolf movement on a range of seismic line densities and drew implications for the rate of predator-prey interactions as described by the functional response. The functional response exhibited a more than linear increase with respect to prey density (type III) as well as interactions with seismic line density. Encounter rates were significantly higher in landscapes with high seismic line density and were most pronounced at low prey densities. This suggests that prey at low population densities are at higher risk in environments with a high seismic line density unless they learn to avoid them.
Citation:
McKenzie HW, Merrill EH, Spiteri RJ, Lewis MA (2012) How linear features alter predator movement and the functional response. Interface Focus 2: 205–216. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsfs.2011.0086.
Publisher:
The Royal Society
Journal:
Interface Focus
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-CI013-04
Issue Date:
18-Jan-2012
DOI:
10.1098/rsfs.2011.0086
PubMed ID:
22419990
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3293201
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2042-8898; 2042-8901
Sponsors:
We wish to acknowledge support from Alberta Ingenuity, NSERC C-GSM, the University of Alberta and the MITACS Mobility Fund (H.W.M.), an NSERC CRO-261091-02 (E.H.M.), NSERC Discovery and MITACS Project Grants (R.J.S.), NSERC Discovery and Accelerator Grants and a Canada Research Chair (M. A. L.). This publication was based on the work supported in part by Award no. KUK-CI013-04 made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST; M.A.L.). We thank N. Webb for providing helpful feedback, H. Beyer for assisting with the GIS analysis and J. Berger for field expertise.
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Hannah Wen
dc.contributor.authorMerrill, Evelyn Hen
dc.contributor.authorSpiteri, Raymond Jen
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Mark Aen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T08:50:44Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T08:50:44Zen
dc.date.issued2012-01-18en
dc.identifier.citationMcKenzie HW, Merrill EH, Spiteri RJ, Lewis MA (2012) How linear features alter predator movement and the functional response. Interface Focus 2: 205–216. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsfs.2011.0086.en
dc.identifier.issn2042-8898en
dc.identifier.issn2042-8901en
dc.identifier.pmid22419990en
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsfs.2011.0086en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596790en
dc.description.abstractIn areas of oil and gas exploration, seismic lines have been reported to alter the movement patterns of wolves (Canis lupus). We developed a mechanistic first passage time model, based on an anisotropic elliptic partial differential equation, and used this to explore how wolf movement responses to seismic lines influence the encounter rate of the wolves with their prey. The model was parametrized using 5 min GPS location data. These data showed that wolves travelled faster on seismic lines and had a higher probability of staying on a seismic line once they were on it. We simulated wolf movement on a range of seismic line densities and drew implications for the rate of predator-prey interactions as described by the functional response. The functional response exhibited a more than linear increase with respect to prey density (type III) as well as interactions with seismic line density. Encounter rates were significantly higher in landscapes with high seismic line density and were most pronounced at low prey densities. This suggests that prey at low population densities are at higher risk in environments with a high seismic line density unless they learn to avoid them.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe wish to acknowledge support from Alberta Ingenuity, NSERC C-GSM, the University of Alberta and the MITACS Mobility Fund (H.W.M.), an NSERC CRO-261091-02 (E.H.M.), NSERC Discovery and MITACS Project Grants (R.J.S.), NSERC Discovery and Accelerator Grants and a Canada Research Chair (M. A. L.). This publication was based on the work supported in part by Award no. KUK-CI013-04 made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST; M.A.L.). We thank N. Webb for providing helpful feedback, H. Beyer for assisting with the GIS analysis and J. Berger for field expertise.en
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en
dc.subjectSpatial heterogeneityen
dc.subjectEncounter Rateen
dc.subjectMean First Passage Timeen
dc.subjectSeismic Linesen
dc.subjectWolf Movementen
dc.titleHow linear features alter predator movement and the functional response.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInterface Focusen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3293201en
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Alberta, Edmonton, Canadaen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Alberta, Edmonton, Canadaen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canadaen
kaust.grant.numberKUK-CI013-04en

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