Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596771
Title:
Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.
Authors:
Via, Allegra; Blicher, Thomas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Brazas, Michelle D; Brooksbank, Cath; Budd, Aidan; De Las Rivas, Javier; Dreyer, Jacqueline; Fernandes, Pedro L; van Gelder, Celia; Jacob, Joachim; Jimenez, Rafael C; Loveland, Jane; Moran, Federico; Mulder, Nicola; Nyrönen, Tommi; Rother, Kristian; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Attwood, Teresa K
Abstract:
The mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes. In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course organizers and trainers on the path towards bioinformatics training excellence but, importantly, also to improve the training experience for life scientists.
Citation:
Via A, Blicher T, Bongcam-Rudloff E, Brazas MD, Brooksbank C, et al. (2013) Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists. Briefings in Bioinformatics 14: 528–537. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bib/bbt043.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (OUP)
Journal:
Briefings in Bioinformatics
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-I1-012-43
Issue Date:
25-Jun-2013
DOI:
10.1093/bib/bbt043
PubMed ID:
23803301
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3771230
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1467-5463; 1477-4054
Sponsors:
The article Open Access charge was jointly funded by The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC, Norwich, UK), the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC, UK), the SLU-Global Bioinformatics Centre (SGBC, Uppsala, Sweden), the SeqAhead (COST Action, BM1006) and EMBnet. Meetings of the Bioinformatics Training Network were hosted at the EBI from 2009-2011, supported by the SLING project, funded by the European Commission within Research Infrastructures of the FP7 Capacities Specific Programme, grant agreement number 226073. The B3CB meeting was hosted by EMBnet in Uppsala, Sweden, and the BTN2012 and the GOBLET kick-off meeting were hosted by the Netherlands Bioinformatics Centre (NBIC). AV is supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), award number KUK-I1-012-43.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVia, Allegraen
dc.contributor.authorBlicher, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorBongcam-Rudloff, Eriken
dc.contributor.authorBrazas, Michelle Den
dc.contributor.authorBrooksbank, Cathen
dc.contributor.authorBudd, Aidanen
dc.contributor.authorDe Las Rivas, Javieren
dc.contributor.authorDreyer, Jacquelineen
dc.contributor.authorFernandes, Pedro Len
dc.contributor.authorvan Gelder, Celiaen
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Joachimen
dc.contributor.authorJimenez, Rafael Cen
dc.contributor.authorLoveland, Janeen
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Federicoen
dc.contributor.authorMulder, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorNyrönen, Tommien
dc.contributor.authorRother, Kristianen
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Maria Victoriaen
dc.contributor.authorAttwood, Teresa Ken
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T08:50:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T08:50:20Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06-25en
dc.identifier.citationVia A, Blicher T, Bongcam-Rudloff E, Brazas MD, Brooksbank C, et al. (2013) Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists. Briefings in Bioinformatics 14: 528–537. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bib/bbt043.en
dc.identifier.issn1467-5463en
dc.identifier.issn1477-4054en
dc.identifier.pmid23803301en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bib/bbt043en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596771en
dc.description.abstractThe mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes. In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course organizers and trainers on the path towards bioinformatics training excellence but, importantly, also to improve the training experience for life scientists.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe article Open Access charge was jointly funded by The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC, Norwich, UK), the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC, UK), the SLU-Global Bioinformatics Centre (SGBC, Uppsala, Sweden), the SeqAhead (COST Action, BM1006) and EMBnet. Meetings of the Bioinformatics Training Network were hosted at the EBI from 2009-2011, supported by the SLING project, funded by the European Commission within Research Infrastructures of the FP7 Capacities Specific Programme, grant agreement number 226073. The B3CB meeting was hosted by EMBnet in Uppsala, Sweden, and the BTN2012 and the GOBLET kick-off meeting were hosted by the Netherlands Bioinformatics Centre (NBIC). AV is supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), award number KUK-I1-012-43.en
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en
dc.subjectBioinformaticsen
dc.subjectTrainingen
dc.subjectBioinformatics Coursesen
dc.subjectTrain The Trainersen
dc.subjectTraining Life Scientistsen
dc.titleBest practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBriefings in Bioinformaticsen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3771230en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics, Sapienza University, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy. allegra.via@uniroma1.it.en
kaust.grant.numberKUK-I1-012-43en

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