Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/596762
Title:
A stochastic model for early placental development.
Authors:
Cotter, Simon L; Klika, Václav; Kimpton, Laura; Collins, Sally; Heazell, Alexander E P
Abstract:
In the human, placental structure is closely related to placental function and consequent pregnancy outcome. Studies have noted abnormal placental shape in small-for-gestational-age infants which extends to increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. The origins and determinants of placental shape are incompletely understood and are difficult to study in vivo. In this paper, we model the early development of the human placenta, based on the hypothesis that this is driven by a chemoattractant effect emanating from proximal spiral arteries in the decidua. We derive and explore a two-dimensional stochastic model, and investigate the effects of loss of spiral arteries in regions near to the cord insertion on the shape of the placenta. This model demonstrates that disruption of spiral arteries can exert profound effects on placental shape, particularly if this is close to the cord insertion. Thus, placental shape reflects the underlying maternal vascular bed. Abnormal placental shape may reflect an abnormal uterine environment, predisposing to pregnancy complications. Through statistical analysis of model placentas, we are able to characterize the probability that a given placenta grew in a disrupted environment, and even able to distinguish between different disruptions.
Citation:
Cotter SL, Klika V, Kimpton L, Collins S, Heazell AEP (2014) A stochastic model for early placental development. Journal of The Royal Society Interface 11: 20140149–20140149. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2014.0149.
Publisher:
The Royal Society
Journal:
Journal of The Royal Society Interface
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-C1-013-04
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2014
DOI:
10.1098/rsif.2014.0149
PubMed ID:
24850904
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4208356
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1742-5689; 1742-5662
Sponsors:
The Study Group and a subsequent follow-up meeting were supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/H00162X/1), and hosted by OCCAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, UK, with institutional support RVO:68407700 for V. K. This publication is based on work supported in part by award no. KUK-C1-013-04, made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCotter, Simon Len
dc.contributor.authorKlika, Václaven
dc.contributor.authorKimpton, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Sallyen
dc.contributor.authorHeazell, Alexander E Pen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-21T08:50:08Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-21T08:50:08Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-01en
dc.identifier.citationCotter SL, Klika V, Kimpton L, Collins S, Heazell AEP (2014) A stochastic model for early placental development. Journal of The Royal Society Interface 11: 20140149–20140149. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2014.0149.en
dc.identifier.issn1742-5689en
dc.identifier.issn1742-5662en
dc.identifier.pmid24850904en
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsif.2014.0149en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/596762en
dc.description.abstractIn the human, placental structure is closely related to placental function and consequent pregnancy outcome. Studies have noted abnormal placental shape in small-for-gestational-age infants which extends to increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. The origins and determinants of placental shape are incompletely understood and are difficult to study in vivo. In this paper, we model the early development of the human placenta, based on the hypothesis that this is driven by a chemoattractant effect emanating from proximal spiral arteries in the decidua. We derive and explore a two-dimensional stochastic model, and investigate the effects of loss of spiral arteries in regions near to the cord insertion on the shape of the placenta. This model demonstrates that disruption of spiral arteries can exert profound effects on placental shape, particularly if this is close to the cord insertion. Thus, placental shape reflects the underlying maternal vascular bed. Abnormal placental shape may reflect an abnormal uterine environment, predisposing to pregnancy complications. Through statistical analysis of model placentas, we are able to characterize the probability that a given placenta grew in a disrupted environment, and even able to distinguish between different disruptions.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Study Group and a subsequent follow-up meeting were supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/H00162X/1), and hosted by OCCAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, UK, with institutional support RVO:68407700 for V. K. This publication is based on work supported in part by award no. KUK-C1-013-04, made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen
dc.rights© 2014 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en
dc.subjectMathematical Modellingen
dc.subjectStochastic Dynamicsen
dc.subjectPlacental Developmenten
dc.subjectSpiral Arteryen
dc.subjectPlacental Shapeen
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen
dc.titleA stochastic model for early placental development.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of The Royal Society Interfaceen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4208356en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK simon.cotter@manchester.ac.uk.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mathematics, FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, Prague 2 12000, Czech Republic Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Woodstock Road, Oxford, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionMathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Woodstock Road, Oxford, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionNuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Fetal Medicine Unit, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Human Development, Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, St Mary's Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK.en
kaust.grant.numberKUK-C1-013-04en

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