Strain effects on the work function of an organic semiconductor

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/595440
Title:
Strain effects on the work function of an organic semiconductor
Authors:
Wu, Yanfei; Chew, Annabel R.; Rojas, Geoffrey A.; Sini, Gjergji; Haugstad, Greg; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Li, Hong; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc ( 0000-0001-7278-4471 ) ; Salleo, Alberto; Frisbie, C. Daniel
Abstract:
Establishing fundamental relationships between strain and work function (WF) in organic semiconductors is important not only for understanding electrical properties of organic thin films, which are subject to both intrinsic and extrinsic strains, but also for developing flexible electronic devices. Here we investigate tensile and compressive strain effects on the WF of rubrene single crystals. Mechanical strain induced by thermal expansion mismatch between the substrate and rubrene is quantified by X-ray diffraction. The corresponding WF change is measured by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The WF of rubrene increases (decreases) significantly with in-plane tensile (compressive) strain, which agrees qualitatively with density functional theory calculations. An elastic-to-plastic transition, characterized by a steep rise of the WF, occurs at ~0.05% tensile strain along the rubrene π-stacking direction. The results provide the first concrete link between mechanical strain and WF of an organic semiconductor and have important implications for understanding the connection between structural and electronic disorder in soft organic electronic materials.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)
Citation:
Strain effects on the work function of an organic semiconductor 2016, 7:10270 Nature Communications
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Nature Communications
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2016
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms10270
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2041-1723
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms10270
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWu, Yanfeien
dc.contributor.authorChew, Annabel R.en
dc.contributor.authorRojas, Geoffrey A.en
dc.contributor.authorSini, Gjergjien
dc.contributor.authorHaugstad, Gregen
dc.contributor.authorBelianinov, Alexen
dc.contributor.authorKalinin, Sergei V.en
dc.contributor.authorLi, Hongen
dc.contributor.authorRisko, Chaden
dc.contributor.authorBredas, Jean-Lucen
dc.contributor.authorSalleo, Albertoen
dc.contributor.authorFrisbie, C. Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-02T13:56:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-02T13:56:39Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-01en
dc.identifier.citationStrain effects on the work function of an organic semiconductor 2016, 7:10270 Nature Communicationsen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms10270en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/595440en
dc.description.abstractEstablishing fundamental relationships between strain and work function (WF) in organic semiconductors is important not only for understanding electrical properties of organic thin films, which are subject to both intrinsic and extrinsic strains, but also for developing flexible electronic devices. Here we investigate tensile and compressive strain effects on the WF of rubrene single crystals. Mechanical strain induced by thermal expansion mismatch between the substrate and rubrene is quantified by X-ray diffraction. The corresponding WF change is measured by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The WF of rubrene increases (decreases) significantly with in-plane tensile (compressive) strain, which agrees qualitatively with density functional theory calculations. An elastic-to-plastic transition, characterized by a steep rise of the WF, occurs at ~0.05% tensile strain along the rubrene π-stacking direction. The results provide the first concrete link between mechanical strain and WF of an organic semiconductor and have important implications for understanding the connection between structural and electronic disorder in soft organic electronic materials.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms10270en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleStrain effects on the work function of an organic semiconductoren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentSolar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)en
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE, Minneapolis, 55455 Minnesota, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, Stanford, 94305 California, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire de Physico-chimie des Polymères et des Interfaces, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 Mail Gay Lussac, Neuville sur Oise, Cergy-Pontoise Cedex 95031, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionCharacterization Facility, University of Minnesota, 100 Union St SE, Minneapolis, 55455 Minnesota, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionCharacterization Facility, University of Minnesota, 100 Union St SE, Minneapolis, 55455 Minnesota, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, 37831 Tennessee, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, 30332 Georgia, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry & Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, 40506 Kentucky, USAen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorSini, Gjergjien
kaust.authorBredas, Jean-Lucen
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