Coral reef fish populations can persist without immigration

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/595317
Title:
Coral reef fish populations can persist without immigration
Authors:
Salles, Océane C.; Maynard, Jeffrey A.; Joannides, Marc; Barbu, Corentin M.; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Almany, Glenn R.; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 ) ; Thorrold, Simon R.; Jones, Geoffrey P.; Planes, Serge
Abstract:
Determining the conditions under which populations may persist requires accurate estimates of demographic parameters, including immigration, local reproductive success, and mortality rates. In marine populations, empirical estimates of these parameters are rare, due at least in part to the pelagic dispersal stage common to most marine organisms. Here, we evaluate population persistence and turnover for a population of orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, at Kimbe Island in Papua New Guinea. All fish in the population were sampled and genotyped on five occasions at 2-year intervals spanning eight years. The genetic data enabled estimates of reproductive success retained in the same population (reproductive success to self-recruitment), reproductive success exported to other subpopulations (reproductive success to local connectivity), and immigration and mortality rates of sub-adults and adults. Approximately 50% of the recruits were assigned to parents from the Kimbe Island population and this was stable through the sampling period. Stability in the proportion of local and immigrant settlers is likely due to: low annual mortality rates and stable egg production rates, and the short larval stages and sensory capacities of reef fish larvae. Biannual mortality rates ranged from 0.09 to 0.55 and varied significantly spatially. We used these data to parametrize a model that estimated the probability of the Kimbe Island population persisting in the absence of immigration. The Kimbe Island population was found to persist without significant immigration. Model results suggest the island population persists because the largest of the subpopulations are maintained due to having low mortality and high self-recruitment rates. Our results enable managers to appropriately target and scale actions to maximize persistence likelihood as disturbance frequencies increase.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Coral reef fish populations can persist without immigration 2015, 282 (1819):20151311 Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Publisher:
The Royal Society
Journal:
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Issue Date:
18-Nov-2015
DOI:
10.1098/rspb.2015.1311
PubMed ID:
26582017
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0962-8452; 1471-2954
Additional Links:
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2015.1311
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSalles, Océane C.en
dc.contributor.authorMaynard, Jeffrey A.en
dc.contributor.authorJoannides, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorBarbu, Corentin M.en
dc.contributor.authorSaenz-Agudelo, Pabloen
dc.contributor.authorAlmany, Glenn R.en
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Geoffrey P.en
dc.contributor.authorPlanes, Sergeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-31T13:40:07Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-31T13:40:07Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11-18en
dc.identifier.citationCoral reef fish populations can persist without immigration 2015, 282 (1819):20151311 Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2954en
dc.identifier.pmid26582017-
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2015.1311en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/595317en
dc.description.abstractDetermining the conditions under which populations may persist requires accurate estimates of demographic parameters, including immigration, local reproductive success, and mortality rates. In marine populations, empirical estimates of these parameters are rare, due at least in part to the pelagic dispersal stage common to most marine organisms. Here, we evaluate population persistence and turnover for a population of orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, at Kimbe Island in Papua New Guinea. All fish in the population were sampled and genotyped on five occasions at 2-year intervals spanning eight years. The genetic data enabled estimates of reproductive success retained in the same population (reproductive success to self-recruitment), reproductive success exported to other subpopulations (reproductive success to local connectivity), and immigration and mortality rates of sub-adults and adults. Approximately 50% of the recruits were assigned to parents from the Kimbe Island population and this was stable through the sampling period. Stability in the proportion of local and immigrant settlers is likely due to: low annual mortality rates and stable egg production rates, and the short larval stages and sensory capacities of reef fish larvae. Biannual mortality rates ranged from 0.09 to 0.55 and varied significantly spatially. We used these data to parametrize a model that estimated the probability of the Kimbe Island population persisting in the absence of immigration. The Kimbe Island population was found to persist without significant immigration. Model results suggest the island population persists because the largest of the subpopulations are maintained due to having low mortality and high self-recruitment rates. Our results enable managers to appropriately target and scale actions to maximize persistence likelihood as disturbance frequencies increase.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2015.1311en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.titleCoral reef fish populations can persist without immigrationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire d’Excellence ‘CORAIL’, USR 3278 CNRS-EPHE-UPVD CRIOBE, Perpignan, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionSymbioSeas and Marine Applied Research Center, Wilmington, NC 28411, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversite de Montpellier 2, UMR 5149 I3M, Pl Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, 800 Blockley Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Universidad Austral de Chile, Chileen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en

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