Design Principles in Polymer-Fullerene BHJ Solar Cells: PBDTTPD as a Case Study

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/595127
Title:
Design Principles in Polymer-Fullerene BHJ Solar Cells: PBDTTPD as a Case Study
Authors:
Beaujuge, Pierre
Abstract:
Among Organic Electronics, solution-processable π-conjugated polymers are proving particularly promising in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells with fullerene acceptors such as PCBM.[1] In recent years, great headway has been made in the development of efficient polymer donors across the community, with published power conversion efficiencies (PCE) >8% in single cells and >10% in tandems. In most reports, these systems involve elaborate repeat unit and side chain patterns, and deviating from those patterns induces substantial drops in device PCE. While the range of polymer design parameters that impact BHJ solar cell performance remains a matter of some debate, our recent developments indicate that the combination of side-chain substituents appended to the main chain critically impacts polymer performance. For example, in poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene–thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD), side-chain substituents of various size and branching impart distinct molecular packing distances (i.e., π–π stacking and lamellar spacing), varying degrees of nanostructural order in thin films, and preferential backbone orientation relative to the device substrate.[2-5] While these structural variations seem to correlate with BHJ solar cell performance, with power conversion efficiencies ranging from 4% to 8.5%,[2,3] we believe that other contributing parameters – such as the local conformations between the polymer and the fullerene, and the domain distribution/composition across the BHJ (i.e., pure/mixed phases) – should also be taken into account.[6,7] Other discrete modifications of PBDTTPD’s molecular structure affect polymer performance in BHJ solar cells with PCBM, and our recent developments emphasize how systematic structure-property relationship studies impact the design of efficient polymer donors for BHJ solar cell applications.[8-10] It is important to further our understanding of these effects as we look to continue improving BHJ solar cell efficiencies.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)
Conference/Event name:
International Conference on Advances in Functional Materials (AFM 2015)
Issue Date:
29-Jun-2015
Type:
Presentation
Additional Links:
http://afm2015.functionalmaterials.org//wp-content/uploads/2015/07/S4-Abs.pdf
Appears in Collections:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC); Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBeaujuge, Pierreen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-28T07:14:04Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-28T07:14:04Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/595127en
dc.description.abstractAmong Organic Electronics, solution-processable π-conjugated polymers are proving particularly promising in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells with fullerene acceptors such as PCBM.[1] In recent years, great headway has been made in the development of efficient polymer donors across the community, with published power conversion efficiencies (PCE) >8% in single cells and >10% in tandems. In most reports, these systems involve elaborate repeat unit and side chain patterns, and deviating from those patterns induces substantial drops in device PCE. While the range of polymer design parameters that impact BHJ solar cell performance remains a matter of some debate, our recent developments indicate that the combination of side-chain substituents appended to the main chain critically impacts polymer performance. For example, in poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene–thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD), side-chain substituents of various size and branching impart distinct molecular packing distances (i.e., π–π stacking and lamellar spacing), varying degrees of nanostructural order in thin films, and preferential backbone orientation relative to the device substrate.[2-5] While these structural variations seem to correlate with BHJ solar cell performance, with power conversion efficiencies ranging from 4% to 8.5%,[2,3] we believe that other contributing parameters – such as the local conformations between the polymer and the fullerene, and the domain distribution/composition across the BHJ (i.e., pure/mixed phases) – should also be taken into account.[6,7] Other discrete modifications of PBDTTPD’s molecular structure affect polymer performance in BHJ solar cells with PCBM, and our recent developments emphasize how systematic structure-property relationship studies impact the design of efficient polymer donors for BHJ solar cell applications.[8-10] It is important to further our understanding of these effects as we look to continue improving BHJ solar cell efficiencies.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://afm2015.functionalmaterials.org//wp-content/uploads/2015/07/S4-Abs.pdfen
dc.subjectPolymeren
dc.subjectfullereneen
dc.subjectbulk-heterojunctionen
dc.subjectPBDTTPDen
dc.subjectsolar cellen
dc.titleDesign Principles in Polymer-Fullerene BHJ Solar Cells: PBDTTPD as a Case Studyen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentSolar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)en
dc.conference.date29 June – 3 July 2015en
dc.conference.nameInternational Conference on Advances in Functional Materials (AFM 2015)en
dc.conference.locationStony Brook University, NY State, USAen
kaust.authorBeaujuge, Pierreen
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