The Influence of Wind and Basin Eddies in Controlling Sea Level Variations in the Coastal Red Sea

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/595114
Title:
The Influence of Wind and Basin Eddies in Controlling Sea Level Variations in the Coastal Red Sea
Authors:
Abualnaja, Yasser; Churchill, James H.; Nellayaputhenpeedika, Mohammedali; Limeburner, Richard
Abstract:
Sea level variations in the central Red Sea coastal zone span a range of roughly 1.2 m. Though relatively small, these water level changes can significantly impact the environment over the shallow reef tops prevalent in the central Red Sea, altering the water depth by a factor or two or more. Roughly half of the coastal sea level variance in central Red Sea is due to elevation changes in an 'intermediate' frequency band, with periods between 2 days and 1 month. We examined the sea level signal in this band using the data from pressure sensors maintained for more than five years at a number of locations in Saudi Arabian coastal waters between 20.1 and 23.5 oN. We find that the intermediate-band sea level variations are strongly correlated with the local wind stress measured at a meteorological buoy. The maximum pressure-wind correlation occurs at wind direction closely aligned with the alongshore orientation and at a lag (wind leading) of 45 hr, which is consistent with the expected response of the coastal sea level to local wind forcing. However, less than half of the sea level variance in the intermediate band is related, through linear correlation, with local wind forcing. Our analysis indicates that the residual coastal sea level signal, not associated with wind forcing, is largely driven remotely by the passage of mesoscale eddies, revealed by satellite altimeter-derived sea level anomaly fields of the central Red Sea. These eddy-driven coastal sea level changes occur on time scales of 10-30 days. They span a range of 0.5 m, and thus constitute an import component of the sea level signal in the coastal Red Sea.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Conference/Event name:
EGU General Assembly 2015
Issue Date:
Apr-2015
Type:
Presentation
Additional Links:
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.8852A
Appears in Collections:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAbualnaja, Yasseren
dc.contributor.authorChurchill, James H.en
dc.contributor.authorNellayaputhenpeedika, Mohammedalien
dc.contributor.authorLimeburner, Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-28T07:13:44Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-28T07:13:44Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/595114en
dc.description.abstractSea level variations in the central Red Sea coastal zone span a range of roughly 1.2 m. Though relatively small, these water level changes can significantly impact the environment over the shallow reef tops prevalent in the central Red Sea, altering the water depth by a factor or two or more. Roughly half of the coastal sea level variance in central Red Sea is due to elevation changes in an 'intermediate' frequency band, with periods between 2 days and 1 month. We examined the sea level signal in this band using the data from pressure sensors maintained for more than five years at a number of locations in Saudi Arabian coastal waters between 20.1 and 23.5 oN. We find that the intermediate-band sea level variations are strongly correlated with the local wind stress measured at a meteorological buoy. The maximum pressure-wind correlation occurs at wind direction closely aligned with the alongshore orientation and at a lag (wind leading) of 45 hr, which is consistent with the expected response of the coastal sea level to local wind forcing. However, less than half of the sea level variance in the intermediate band is related, through linear correlation, with local wind forcing. Our analysis indicates that the residual coastal sea level signal, not associated with wind forcing, is largely driven remotely by the passage of mesoscale eddies, revealed by satellite altimeter-derived sea level anomaly fields of the central Red Sea. These eddy-driven coastal sea level changes occur on time scales of 10-30 days. They span a range of 0.5 m, and thus constitute an import component of the sea level signal in the coastal Red Sea.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.8852Aen
dc.titleThe Influence of Wind and Basin Eddies in Controlling Sea Level Variations in the Coastal Red Seaen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.conference.date12-17 April, 2015en
dc.conference.nameEGU General Assembly 2015en
dc.conference.locationVienna, Austriaen
dc.contributor.institutionWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography, MA 02543-1050, U.S.A.en
kaust.authorAbualnaja, Yasseren
kaust.authorNellayaputhenpeedika, Mohammedalien
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.