Food supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/594359
Title:
Food supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification
Authors:
Ramajo, Laura; Pérez-León, Elia; Hendriks, Iris E.; Marbà, Núria; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Sejr, Mikael K.; Blicher, Martin E.; Lagos, Nelson A.; Olsen, Ylva S.; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 )
Abstract:
Invasion of ocean surface waters by anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is expected to reduce surface seawater pH to 7.8 by the end of this century compromising marine calcifiers. A broad range of biological and mineralogical mechanisms allow marine calcifiers to cope with ocean acidification, however these mechanisms are energetically demanding which affect other biological processes (trade-offs) with important implications for the resilience of the organisms against stressful conditions. Hence, food availability may play a critical role in determining the resistance of calcifiers to OA. Here we show, based on a meta-analysis of existing experimental results assessing the role of food supply in the response of organisms to OA, that food supply consistently confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Food supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification 2016, 6:19374 Scientific Reports
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
18-Jan-2016
DOI:
10.1038/srep19374
PubMed ID:
26778520
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep19374
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRamajo, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorPérez-León, Eliaen
dc.contributor.authorHendriks, Iris E.en
dc.contributor.authorMarbà, Núriaen
dc.contributor.authorKrause-Jensen, Dorteen
dc.contributor.authorSejr, Mikael K.en
dc.contributor.authorBlicher, Martin E.en
dc.contributor.authorLagos, Nelson A.en
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Ylva S.en
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T15:05:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T15:05:17Zen
dc.date.issued2016-01-18en
dc.identifier.citationFood supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification 2016, 6:19374 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.pmid26778520-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep19374en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594359en
dc.description.abstractInvasion of ocean surface waters by anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is expected to reduce surface seawater pH to 7.8 by the end of this century compromising marine calcifiers. A broad range of biological and mineralogical mechanisms allow marine calcifiers to cope with ocean acidification, however these mechanisms are energetically demanding which affect other biological processes (trade-offs) with important implications for the resilience of the organisms against stressful conditions. Hence, food availability may play a critical role in determining the resistance of calcifiers to OA. Here we show, based on a meta-analysis of existing experimental results assessing the role of food supply in the response of organisms to OA, that food supply consistently confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep19374en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleFood supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidificationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionGlobal Change Department, Instituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados (IMEDEA, CSIC-UIB), C/ Miquel Marqués 21, 07190 Esporles, Islas Baleares, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCentro de Investigación e Innovación para el Cambio Climático (CiiCC), Universidad Santo Tomás, Avda. Ejército 146, 8370003 Santiago, Chileen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600 Silkeborg, Denmarken
dc.contributor.institutionArctic Research Centre, Bioscience, Aarhus University, C. F. Møllers Allé 8, 8000 Aarhus, Denmarken
dc.contributor.institutionGreenland Climate Research Centre, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Kivioq 2 P.O. Box 570, 3900 Nuuk, Greenlanden
dc.contributor.institutionPlant Biology and The UWA Oceans Institute, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.