Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/594272
Title:
Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments
Authors:
Li, Dong; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Drewes, Jorg
Abstract:
To reveal the variation of microbial community functions during water filtration process in river sediments, which has been utilized widely in natural water treatment systems, this study investigates the influence of municipal wastewater discharge to streams on the phylotype and metabolic potential of the microbiome in upstream and particularly various depths of downstream river sediments. Cluster analyses based on both microbial phylogenetic and functional data collectively revealed that shallow upstream sediments grouped with those from deeper subsurface downstream regions. These sediment samples were distinct from those found in shallow downstream sediments. Functional genes associated with carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and certain amino acid metabolisms were overrepresented in upstream and deep downstream samples. In contrast, the more immediate contact with wastewater discharge in shallow downstream samples resulted in an increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen, sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction–modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast, in shallow downstream sediments, genera affiliated with Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were enriched with putative functions that included ammonia and sulfur oxidation, polyphosphate accumulation, and methylotrophic bacteria. Collectively, these results highlight the enhanced capabilities of microbial communities residing in deeper stream sediments for the transformation of water contaminants and thus provide a foundation for better design of natural water treatment systems to further improve the removal of contaminants. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Li D, Sharp JO, Drewes JE (2015) Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments. Microbial Ecology 71: 78–86. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00248-015-0680-x.
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Microbial Ecology
Issue Date:
24-Sep-2015
DOI:
10.1007/s00248-015-0680-x
PubMed ID:
26403720
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0095-3628; 1432-184X
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Dongen
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Jonathan O.en
dc.contributor.authorDrewes, Jorgen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T14:44:52Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T14:44:52Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-24en
dc.identifier.citationLi D, Sharp JO, Drewes JE (2015) Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments. Microbial Ecology 71: 78–86. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00248-015-0680-x.en
dc.identifier.issn0095-3628en
dc.identifier.issn1432-184Xen
dc.identifier.pmid26403720en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-015-0680-xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594272en
dc.description.abstractTo reveal the variation of microbial community functions during water filtration process in river sediments, which has been utilized widely in natural water treatment systems, this study investigates the influence of municipal wastewater discharge to streams on the phylotype and metabolic potential of the microbiome in upstream and particularly various depths of downstream river sediments. Cluster analyses based on both microbial phylogenetic and functional data collectively revealed that shallow upstream sediments grouped with those from deeper subsurface downstream regions. These sediment samples were distinct from those found in shallow downstream sediments. Functional genes associated with carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and certain amino acid metabolisms were overrepresented in upstream and deep downstream samples. In contrast, the more immediate contact with wastewater discharge in shallow downstream samples resulted in an increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen, sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction–modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast, in shallow downstream sediments, genera affiliated with Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were enriched with putative functions that included ammonia and sulfur oxidation, polyphosphate accumulation, and methylotrophic bacteria. Collectively, these results highlight the enhanced capabilities of microbial communities residing in deeper stream sediments for the transformation of water contaminants and thus provide a foundation for better design of natural water treatment systems to further improve the removal of contaminants. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.en
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.subjectFunctional genesen
dc.subjectMetagenomicsen
dc.subjectPhylogeneticsen
dc.subjectSedimenten
dc.subjectWastewater dischargeen
dc.titleInfluence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sedimentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalMicrobial Ecologyen
dc.contributor.institutionNSF Engineering Research Center ReNUWIt, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionChair of Urban Water Systems Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Am Coulombwall 8, Garching, Germanyen
kaust.authorLi, Dongen
kaust.authorDrewes, Jorgen
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