Consolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutions

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/594109
Title:
Consolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutions
Authors:
Afify, N. D.; Salem, H. G.; Yavari, A.; El Sayed, Tamer S.
Abstract:
Deriving bulk materials with ultra-high mechanical strength from nanometer-sized single metalic crystals depends on the consolidation procedure. We present an accurate molecular dynamics study to quantify microstructure responses to consolidation. Aluminum single crystals with an average size up to 10.7 nm were hydrostatically compressed at temperatures up to 900 K and pressures up to 5 GPa. The consolidated material developed an average grain size that grew exponentially with the consolidation temperature, with a growth rate dependent on the starting average grain size and the consolidation pressure. The evolution of the microstructure was accompanied by a significant reduction in the concentration of defects. The ratio of vacancies to dislocation cores decreased with the average grain size and then increased after reaching a critical average grain size. The deformation mechanisms of poly-crystalline metals can be better understood in the light of the current findings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Afify ND, Salem HG, Yavari A, El Sayed T (2014) Consolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutions. Computational Materials Science 85: 306–309. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.11.027.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Computational Materials Science
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.11.027
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0927-0256
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAfify, N. D.en
dc.contributor.authorSalem, H. G.en
dc.contributor.authorYavari, A.en
dc.contributor.authorEl Sayed, Tamer S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T13:21:51Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T13:21:51Zen
dc.date.issued2014-04en
dc.identifier.citationAfify ND, Salem HG, Yavari A, El Sayed T (2014) Consolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutions. Computational Materials Science 85: 306–309. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.11.027.en
dc.identifier.issn0927-0256en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.11.027en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594109en
dc.description.abstractDeriving bulk materials with ultra-high mechanical strength from nanometer-sized single metalic crystals depends on the consolidation procedure. We present an accurate molecular dynamics study to quantify microstructure responses to consolidation. Aluminum single crystals with an average size up to 10.7 nm were hydrostatically compressed at temperatures up to 900 K and pressures up to 5 GPa. The consolidated material developed an average grain size that grew exponentially with the consolidation temperature, with a growth rate dependent on the starting average grain size and the consolidation pressure. The evolution of the microstructure was accompanied by a significant reduction in the concentration of defects. The ratio of vacancies to dislocation cores decreased with the average grain size and then increased after reaching a critical average grain size. The deformation mechanisms of poly-crystalline metals can be better understood in the light of the current findings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectConsolidationen
dc.subjectMolecular dynamics simulationen
dc.subjectNano-crystalline metalsen
dc.subjectVoronoi tessellationen
dc.titleConsolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalComputational Materials Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionEgypt Nanotechnology Research Center, El-Sheikh Zayed City, Giza, Egypten
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, Yousef Jameel Science and Technology Research Center, American University in Cairo, AUC Avenue, New Cairo 11835, Egypten
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United Statesen
kaust.authorEl Sayed, Tamer S.en
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