Spectral Tuning in the Eyes of Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae): A Novel Sexually Dimorphic Intra-Ocular Filter

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/594106
Title:
Spectral Tuning in the Eyes of Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae): A Novel Sexually Dimorphic Intra-Ocular Filter
Authors:
De Busserolles, Fanny; Hart, Nathan S.; Hunt, David M.; Davies, Wayne I.; Marshall, N. Justin; Clarke, Michael W.; Hahne, Dorothee; Collin, Shaun P.
Abstract:
Deep-sea fishes possess several adaptations to facilitate vision where light detection is pushed to its limit. Lanternfishes (Myctophidae), one of the world's most abundant groups of mesopelagic fishes, possess a novel and unique visual specialisation, a sexually dimorphic photostable yellow pigmentation, constituting the first record of a visual sexual dimorphism in any non-primate vertebrate. The topographic distribution of the yellow pigmentation across the retina is species specific, varying in location, shape and size. Spectrophotometric analyses reveal that this new retinal specialisation differs between species in terms of composition and acts as a filter, absorbing maximally between 356 and 443 nm. Microspectrophotometry and molecular analyses indicate that the species containing this pigmentation also possess at least 2 spectrally distinct rod visual pigments as a result of a duplication of the Rh1 opsin gene. After modelling the effect of the yellow pigmentation on photoreceptor spectral sensitivity, we suggest that this unique specialisation acts as a filter to enhance contrast, thereby improving the detection of bioluminescent emissions and possibly fluorescence in the extreme environment of the deep sea. The fact that this yellow pigmentation is species specific, sexually dimorphic and isolated within specific parts of the retina indicates an evolutionary pressure to visualise prey/predators/mates in a particular part of each species' visual field. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
De Busserolles F, Hart NS, Hunt DM, Davies WI, Marshall NJ, et al. (2015) Spectral Tuning in the Eyes of Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae): A Novel Sexually Dimorphic Intra-Ocular Filter. Brain, Behavior and Evolution 85: 77–93. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371652.
Publisher:
S. Karger AG
Journal:
Brain, Behavior and Evolution
Issue Date:
6-Mar-2015
DOI:
10.1159/000371652
PubMed ID:
25766394
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0006-8977; 1421-9743
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDe Busserolles, Fannyen
dc.contributor.authorHart, Nathan S.en
dc.contributor.authorHunt, David M.en
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Wayne I.en
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, N. Justinen
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Michael W.en
dc.contributor.authorHahne, Dorotheeen
dc.contributor.authorCollin, Shaun P.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T13:21:47Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T13:21:47Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-06en
dc.identifier.citationDe Busserolles F, Hart NS, Hunt DM, Davies WI, Marshall NJ, et al. (2015) Spectral Tuning in the Eyes of Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae): A Novel Sexually Dimorphic Intra-Ocular Filter. Brain, Behavior and Evolution 85: 77–93. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371652.en
dc.identifier.issn0006-8977en
dc.identifier.issn1421-9743en
dc.identifier.pmid25766394en
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000371652en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594106en
dc.description.abstractDeep-sea fishes possess several adaptations to facilitate vision where light detection is pushed to its limit. Lanternfishes (Myctophidae), one of the world's most abundant groups of mesopelagic fishes, possess a novel and unique visual specialisation, a sexually dimorphic photostable yellow pigmentation, constituting the first record of a visual sexual dimorphism in any non-primate vertebrate. The topographic distribution of the yellow pigmentation across the retina is species specific, varying in location, shape and size. Spectrophotometric analyses reveal that this new retinal specialisation differs between species in terms of composition and acts as a filter, absorbing maximally between 356 and 443 nm. Microspectrophotometry and molecular analyses indicate that the species containing this pigmentation also possess at least 2 spectrally distinct rod visual pigments as a result of a duplication of the Rh1 opsin gene. After modelling the effect of the yellow pigmentation on photoreceptor spectral sensitivity, we suggest that this unique specialisation acts as a filter to enhance contrast, thereby improving the detection of bioluminescent emissions and possibly fluorescence in the extreme environment of the deep sea. The fact that this yellow pigmentation is species specific, sexually dimorphic and isolated within specific parts of the retina indicates an evolutionary pressure to visualise prey/predators/mates in a particular part of each species' visual field. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.en
dc.publisherS. Karger AGen
dc.subjectBioluminescenceen
dc.subjectMicrospectrophotometryen
dc.subjectMyctophidsen
dc.subjectOpsinsen
dc.subjectRetinal filteren
dc.subjectSexual dimorphismen
dc.subjectSpectral tuningen
dc.subjectYellow pigmenten
dc.titleSpectral Tuning in the Eyes of Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae): A Novel Sexually Dimorphic Intra-Ocular Filteren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalBrain, Behavior and Evolutionen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Animal Biology, Oceans Institute, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionLions Eye Institute, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionUWA Centre for Metabolomics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSensory Neurobiology Group, Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australiaen
kaust.authorBusserolles, Fanny deen

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