Mechanism of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals revealed

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/594101
Title:
Mechanism of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals revealed
Authors:
Afify, N. D.; Salem, H. G.; Yavari, A.; El Sayed, Tamer S.
Abstract:
Clear understanding of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals is required to derive advanced mechanical components retaining such superiority. Although high quality studies have been reported on nano-crystalline metals, the superiority of small single crystals has neither been fundamentally explained nor quantified to this date. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of aluminum single crystals in the size range from 4.1 nm to 40.5 nm. We show that the ultimate mechanical strength deteriorates exponentially as the single crystal size increases. The small crystals superiority is explained by their ability to continuously form vacancies and to recover them. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.
KAUST Department:
Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Afify ND, Salem HG, Yavari A, El Sayed T (2013) Mechanism of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals revealed. Computational Materials Science 78: 34–38. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.05.011.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Computational Materials Science
Issue Date:
Oct-2013
DOI:
10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.05.011
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0927-0256
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAfify, N. D.en
dc.contributor.authorSalem, H. G.en
dc.contributor.authorYavari, A.en
dc.contributor.authorEl Sayed, Tamer S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T13:21:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T13:21:39Zen
dc.date.issued2013-10en
dc.identifier.citationAfify ND, Salem HG, Yavari A, El Sayed T (2013) Mechanism of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals revealed. Computational Materials Science 78: 34–38. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.05.011.en
dc.identifier.issn0927-0256en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.commatsci.2013.05.011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594101en
dc.description.abstractClear understanding of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals is required to derive advanced mechanical components retaining such superiority. Although high quality studies have been reported on nano-crystalline metals, the superiority of small single crystals has neither been fundamentally explained nor quantified to this date. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of aluminum single crystals in the size range from 4.1 nm to 40.5 nm. We show that the ultimate mechanical strength deteriorates exponentially as the single crystal size increases. The small crystals superiority is explained by their ability to continuously form vacancies and to recover them. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectAluminum single crystalsen
dc.subjectMolecular dynamics simulationen
dc.subjectNano-crystalline metalsen
dc.titleMechanism of the superior mechanical strength of nanometer-sized metal single crystals revealeden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalComputational Materials Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionEgypt Nanotechnology Research Center, El-Sheikh Zayed City, Giza, Egypten
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, Yousef Jameel Science and Technology Research Center, American University in Cairo, AUC Avenue, New Cairo 11835, Egypten
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United Statesen
kaust.authorEl Sayed, Tamer S.en
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