Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/594097
Title:
Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient
Authors:
Dreszer, C.; Flemming, H. C.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Kruithof, J. C.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
Biofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20ms-1) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20Lm-2h-1. As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25mgL-1 carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2ms-1) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2ms-1 and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Dreszer C, Flemming H-C, Zwijnenburg A, Kruithof JC, Vrouwenvelder JS (2014) Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient. Water Research 50: 200–211. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2013.11.024.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Mar-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2013.11.024
PubMed ID:
24374131
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0043-1354
Sponsors:
This work was performed at Wetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology (www.wetsus.nl). Wetsus is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, the European Union European Regional Development Fund, the Province of Fryslan, the city of Leeuwarden and by the EZ-KOMPAS Program of the "Samenwerkingsverband Noord-Nederland" and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The authors like to thank the participants of the research theme "Biofouling", KAUST and Evides waterbedrijf for the fruitful discussions and their financial support. In addition, the authors would especially like to thank the students Malgorzata Nowak and Stanislaw Wojciechowski for their contribution to the experimental work.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDreszer, C.en
dc.contributor.authorFlemming, H. C.en
dc.contributor.authorZwijnenburg, A.en
dc.contributor.authorKruithof, J. C.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T13:21:34Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T13:21:34Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03en
dc.identifier.citationDreszer C, Flemming H-C, Zwijnenburg A, Kruithof JC, Vrouwenvelder JS (2014) Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient. Water Research 50: 200–211. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2013.11.024.en
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en
dc.identifier.pmid24374131en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2013.11.024en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/594097en
dc.description.abstractBiofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20ms-1) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20Lm-2h-1. As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25mgL-1 carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2ms-1) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2ms-1 and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was performed at Wetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology (www.wetsus.nl). Wetsus is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, the European Union European Regional Development Fund, the Province of Fryslan, the city of Leeuwarden and by the EZ-KOMPAS Program of the "Samenwerkingsverband Noord-Nederland" and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The authors like to thank the participants of the research theme "Biofouling", KAUST and Evides waterbedrijf for the fruitful discussions and their financial support. In addition, the authors would especially like to thank the students Malgorzata Nowak and Stanislaw Wojciechowski for their contribution to the experimental work.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectBiofoulingen
dc.subjectLinear flow velocityen
dc.subjectMFen
dc.subjectSpacer channel pressure dropen
dc.subjectSubstrate loaden
dc.subjectTrans membrane pressure dropen
dc.titleImpact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrienten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Agora 1, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionBiofilm Centre, University Duisburg-Essen, Universitätsstrasse 5, 45141 Essen, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en

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