The trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/593701
Title:
The trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface
Authors:
Fusi, Marco ( 0000-0001-7433-2487 ) ; Cannicci, Stefano; Daffonchio, Daniele ( 0000-0003-0947-925X ) ; Mostert, Bruce; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Giomi, Folco
Abstract:
The principle of oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance in ectotherms suggests that the long-term upper limits of an organism's thermal niche are equivalent to the upper limits of the organism's functional capacity for oxygen provision to tissues. Air-breathing ectotherms show wider thermal tolerances, since they can take advantage of the higher availability of oxygen in air than in water. Bimodal species move from aquatic to aerial media and switch between habitats in response to environmental variations such as cyclical or anomalous temperature fluctuations. Here we tested the prediction that bimodal species cope better with thermal stress than truly aquatic species using the crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus as a model species. When in water, oxygen consumption rates of P. marmoratus acutely rise during warming. Beyond a temperature threshold of 23 °C the crab's aerobic metabolism in air remains lower than in water. In parallel, the haemolymph oxygen partial pressure of submerged animals progressive decreases during warming, while it remains low but constant during emersion. Our results demonstrate the ability of a bimodal breathing ectotherm to extend its thermal tolerance during air-breathing, suggesting that there are temperature-related physiological benefits during the evolution of the bimodal life style.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
The trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface 2016, 6:19158 Scientific Reports
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
13-Jan-2016
DOI:
10.1038/srep19158
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep19158
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFusi, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorCannicci, Stefanoen
dc.contributor.authorDaffonchio, Danieleen
dc.contributor.authorMostert, Bruceen
dc.contributor.authorPörtner, Hans-Ottoen
dc.contributor.authorGiomi, Folcoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-18T08:33:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-18T08:33:03Zen
dc.date.issued2016-01-13en
dc.identifier.citationThe trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface 2016, 6:19158 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep19158en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/593701en
dc.description.abstractThe principle of oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance in ectotherms suggests that the long-term upper limits of an organism's thermal niche are equivalent to the upper limits of the organism's functional capacity for oxygen provision to tissues. Air-breathing ectotherms show wider thermal tolerances, since they can take advantage of the higher availability of oxygen in air than in water. Bimodal species move from aquatic to aerial media and switch between habitats in response to environmental variations such as cyclical or anomalous temperature fluctuations. Here we tested the prediction that bimodal species cope better with thermal stress than truly aquatic species using the crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus as a model species. When in water, oxygen consumption rates of P. marmoratus acutely rise during warming. Beyond a temperature threshold of 23 °C the crab's aerobic metabolism in air remains lower than in water. In parallel, the haemolymph oxygen partial pressure of submerged animals progressive decreases during warming, while it remains low but constant during emersion. Our results demonstrate the ability of a bimodal breathing ectotherm to extend its thermal tolerance during air-breathing, suggesting that there are temperature-related physiological benefits during the evolution of the bimodal life style.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep19158en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleThe trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interfaceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Florence, Sesto Fiorentino, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Swire Institute of Marine Science and the School of Biological Sciences, the University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kongen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, Africaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment Integrative Ecophysiology, Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germanyen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorFusi, Marcoen
kaust.authorDaffonchio, Danieleen
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