Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/593345
Title:
Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves
Authors:
Yu, Han; Guo, Bowen; Hanafy, Sherif; Lin, Fan-Chi; Schuster, Gerard T. ( 0000-0001-7532-1587 )
Abstract:
We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Publisher:
Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Journal:
SEG Technical Program Expanded Abstracts 2014
Conference/Event name:
SEG Technical Program Expanded Abstracts 2014
Issue Date:
5-Aug-2014
DOI:
10.1190/segam2014-0737.1
Type:
Conference Paper
Additional Links:
http://library.seg.org/doi/abs/10.1190/segam2014-0737.1
Appears in Collections:
Conference Papers; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYu, Hanen
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Bowenen
dc.contributor.authorHanafy, Sherifen
dc.contributor.authorLin, Fan-Chien
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, Gerard T.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-13T09:50:18Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-13T09:50:18Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-05en
dc.identifier.doi10.1190/segam2014-0737.1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/593345en
dc.description.abstractWe show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.en
dc.publisherSociety of Exploration Geophysicistsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://library.seg.org/doi/abs/10.1190/segam2014-0737.1en
dc.subject2Den
dc.subjectfaultsen
dc.subjectmigrationen
dc.subjectsurface waveen
dc.titleDirect detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface wavesen
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalSEG Technical Program Expanded Abstracts 2014en
dc.conference.nameSEG Technical Program Expanded Abstracts 2014en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112en
kaust.authorYu, Hanen
kaust.authorGuo, Bowenen
kaust.authorHanafy, Sherifen
kaust.authorSchuster, Gerard T.en
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