The WACMOS-ET project – Part 1: Tower-scale evaluation of four remote sensing-based evapotranspiration algorithms

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/592892
Title:
The WACMOS-ET project – Part 1: Tower-scale evaluation of four remote sensing-based evapotranspiration algorithms
Authors:
Michel, D.; Jiménez, C.; Miralles, D. G. ( 0000-0001-6186-5751 ) ; Jung, M.; Hirschi, M.; Ershadi, A.; Martens, B.; McCabe, Matthew ( 0000-0002-1279-5272 ) ; Fisher, J. B.; Mu, Q.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Wood, E. F.; Fernández-Prieto, D.
Abstract:
The WACMOS-ET project has compiled a forcing data set covering the period 2005–2007 that aims to maximize the exploitation of European Earth Observations data sets for evapotranspiration (ET) estimation. The data set was used to run 4 established ET algorithms: the Priestley–Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory model (PT-JPL), the Penman–Monteith algorithm from the MODIS evaporation product (PM-MOD), the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) and the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). In addition, in-situ meteorological data from 24 FLUXNET towers was used to force the models, with results from both forcing sets compared to tower-based flux observations. Model performance was assessed across several time scales using both sub-daily and daily forcings. The PT-JPL model and GLEAM provide the best performance for both satellite- and tower-based forcing as well as for the considered temporal resolutions. Simulations using the PM-MOD were mostly underestimated, while the SEBS performance was characterized by a systematic overestimation. In general, all four algorithms produce the best results in wet and moderately wet climate regimes. In dry regimes, the correlation and the absolute agreement to the reference tower ET observations were consistently lower. While ET derived with in situ forcing data agrees best with the tower measurements (<i>R</i><sup>2</sup> = 0.67), the agreement of the satellite-based ET estimates is only marginally lower (<i>R</i><sup>2</sup> = 0.58). Results also show similar model performance at daily and sub-daily (3-hourly) resolutions. Overall, our validation experiments against in situ measurements indicate that there is no single best-performing algorithm across all biome and forcing types. An extension of the evaluation to a larger selection of 85 towers (model inputs re-sampled to a common grid to facilitate global estimates) confirmed the original findings.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
The WACMOS-ET project – Part 1: Tower-scale evaluation of four remote sensing-based evapotranspiration algorithms 2015, 12 (10):10739 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions
Publisher:
Copernicus GmbH
Journal:
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions
Issue Date:
20-Oct-2015
DOI:
10.5194/hessd-12-10739-2015
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1812-2116
Additional Links:
http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/12/10739/2015/
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMichel, D.en
dc.contributor.authorJiménez, C.en
dc.contributor.authorMiralles, D. G.en
dc.contributor.authorJung, M.en
dc.contributor.authorHirschi, M.en
dc.contributor.authorErshadi, A.en
dc.contributor.authorMartens, B.en
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorFisher, J. B.en
dc.contributor.authorMu, Q.en
dc.contributor.authorSeneviratne, S. I.en
dc.contributor.authorWood, E. F.en
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Prieto, D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-06T06:21:21Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-06T06:21:21Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10-20en
dc.identifier.citationThe WACMOS-ET project – Part 1: Tower-scale evaluation of four remote sensing-based evapotranspiration algorithms 2015, 12 (10):10739 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussionsen
dc.identifier.issn1812-2116en
dc.identifier.doi10.5194/hessd-12-10739-2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/592892en
dc.description.abstractThe WACMOS-ET project has compiled a forcing data set covering the period 2005–2007 that aims to maximize the exploitation of European Earth Observations data sets for evapotranspiration (ET) estimation. The data set was used to run 4 established ET algorithms: the Priestley–Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory model (PT-JPL), the Penman–Monteith algorithm from the MODIS evaporation product (PM-MOD), the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) and the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). In addition, in-situ meteorological data from 24 FLUXNET towers was used to force the models, with results from both forcing sets compared to tower-based flux observations. Model performance was assessed across several time scales using both sub-daily and daily forcings. The PT-JPL model and GLEAM provide the best performance for both satellite- and tower-based forcing as well as for the considered temporal resolutions. Simulations using the PM-MOD were mostly underestimated, while the SEBS performance was characterized by a systematic overestimation. In general, all four algorithms produce the best results in wet and moderately wet climate regimes. In dry regimes, the correlation and the absolute agreement to the reference tower ET observations were consistently lower. While ET derived with in situ forcing data agrees best with the tower measurements (<i>R</i><sup>2</sup> = 0.67), the agreement of the satellite-based ET estimates is only marginally lower (<i>R</i><sup>2</sup> = 0.58). Results also show similar model performance at daily and sub-daily (3-hourly) resolutions. Overall, our validation experiments against in situ measurements indicate that there is no single best-performing algorithm across all biome and forcing types. An extension of the evaluation to a larger selection of 85 towers (model inputs re-sampled to a common grid to facilitate global estimates) confirmed the original findings.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCopernicus GmbHen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/12/10739/2015/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.en
dc.titleThe WACMOS-ET project – Part 1: Tower-scale evaluation of four remote sensing-based evapotranspiration algorithmsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussionsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionEstellus, Paris, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionLERMA, Paris Observatory, Paris, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Earth Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Hydrology and Water Management, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.institutionMax Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionJet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionESRIN, European Space Agency, Frascati, Italyen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorMcCabe, Matthewen
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