Dynamic 3D shape of the plantar surface of the foot using coded structured light: a technical report

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/592741
Title:
Dynamic 3D shape of the plantar surface of the foot using coded structured light: a technical report
Authors:
Thabet, Ali Kassem ( 0000-0001-7513-0748 ) ; Trucco, Emanuele; Salvi, Joaquim; Wang, Weijie; Abboud, Rami J
Abstract:
Background The foot provides a crucial contribution to the balance and stability of the musculoskeletal system, and accurate foot measurements are important in applications such as designing custom insoles/footwear. With better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the foot, dynamic foot reconstruction techniques are surfacing as useful ways to properly measure the shape of the foot. This paper presents a novel design and implementation of a structured-light prototype system providing dense three dimensional (3D) measurements of the foot in motion. The input to the system is a video sequence of a foot during a single step; the output is a 3D reconstruction of the plantar surface of the foot for each frame of the input. Methods Engineering and clinical tests were carried out to test the accuracy and repeatability of the system. Accuracy experiments involved imaging a planar surface from different orientations and elevations and measuring the fitting errors of the data to a plane. Repeatability experiments were done using reconstructions from 27 different subjects, where for each one both right and left feet were reconstructed in static and dynamic conditions over two different days. Results The static accuracy of the system was found to be 0.3 mm with planar test objects. In tests with real feet, the system proved repeatable, with reconstruction differences between trials one week apart averaging 2.4 mm (static case) and 2.8 mm (dynamic case). Conclusion The results obtained in the experiments show positive accuracy and repeatability results when compared to current literature. The design also shows to be superior to the systems available in the literature in several factors. Further studies need to be done to quantify the reliability of the system in clinical environments.
KAUST Department:
Image and Video Understanding Lab
Citation:
Dynamic 3D shape of the plantar surface of the foot using coded structured light: a technical report 2014, 7 (1):5 Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
Issue Date:
23-Jan-2014
DOI:
10.1186/1757-1146-7-5
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1757-1146
Additional Links:
http://www.jfootankleres.com/content/7/1/5
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThabet, Ali Kassemen
dc.contributor.authorTrucco, Emanueleen
dc.contributor.authorSalvi, Joaquimen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Weijieen
dc.contributor.authorAbboud, Rami Jen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T06:18:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-04T06:18:16Zen
dc.date.issued2014-01-23en
dc.identifier.citationDynamic 3D shape of the plantar surface of the foot using coded structured light: a technical report 2014, 7 (1):5 Journal of Foot and Ankle Researchen
dc.identifier.issn1757-1146en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1757-1146-7-5en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/592741en
dc.description.abstractBackground The foot provides a crucial contribution to the balance and stability of the musculoskeletal system, and accurate foot measurements are important in applications such as designing custom insoles/footwear. With better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the foot, dynamic foot reconstruction techniques are surfacing as useful ways to properly measure the shape of the foot. This paper presents a novel design and implementation of a structured-light prototype system providing dense three dimensional (3D) measurements of the foot in motion. The input to the system is a video sequence of a foot during a single step; the output is a 3D reconstruction of the plantar surface of the foot for each frame of the input. Methods Engineering and clinical tests were carried out to test the accuracy and repeatability of the system. Accuracy experiments involved imaging a planar surface from different orientations and elevations and measuring the fitting errors of the data to a plane. Repeatability experiments were done using reconstructions from 27 different subjects, where for each one both right and left feet were reconstructed in static and dynamic conditions over two different days. Results The static accuracy of the system was found to be 0.3 mm with planar test objects. In tests with real feet, the system proved repeatable, with reconstruction differences between trials one week apart averaging 2.4 mm (static case) and 2.8 mm (dynamic case). Conclusion The results obtained in the experiments show positive accuracy and repeatability results when compared to current literature. The design also shows to be superior to the systems available in the literature in several factors. Further studies need to be done to quantify the reliability of the system in clinical environments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jfootankleres.com/content/7/1/5en
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen
dc.subject3D foot reconstructionen
dc.subjectDynamic footen
dc.subjectFoot measurementsen
dc.subjectCADen
dc.titleDynamic 3D shape of the plantar surface of the foot using coded structured light: a technical reporten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentImage and Video Understanding Laben
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Foot and Ankle Researchen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Motion Analysis and Research, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Tayside Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Technology Centre, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UKen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Computing, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 4HN, UKen
dc.contributor.institutionComputer Vision and Robotics Group, University of Girona, 17071 Girona, Spainen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorThabet, Ali Kassemen
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