Born small, die young: Intrinsic, size-selective mortality in marine larval fish

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/592605
Title:
Born small, die young: Intrinsic, size-selective mortality in marine larval fish
Authors:
Garrido, S.; Ben-Hamadou, R.; Santos, A.M.P.; Ferreira, S.; Teodósio, M.A.; Cotano, U.; Irigoien, Xabier ( 0000-0002-5411-6741 ) ; Peck, M.A.; Saiz, E.; Ré, P.
Abstract:
Mortality during the early stages is a major cause of the natural variations in the size and recruitment strength of marine fish populations. In this study, the relation between the size-at-hatch and early survival was assessed using laboratory experiments and on field-caught larvae of the European sardine (Sardina pilchardus). Larval size-at-hatch was not related to the egg size but was significantly, positively related to the diameter of the otolith-at-hatch. Otolith diameter-at-hatch was also significantly correlated with survival-at-age in fed and unfed larvae in the laboratory. For sardine larvae collected in the Bay of Biscay during the spring of 2008, otolith radius-at-hatch was also significantly related to viability. Larval mortality has frequently been related to adverse environmental conditions and intrinsic factors affecting feeding ability and vulnerability to predators. Our study offers evidence indicating that a significant portion of fish mortality occurs during the endogenous (yolk) and mixed (yolk /prey) feeding period in the absence of predators, revealing that marine fish with high fecundity, such as small pelagics, can spawn a relatively large amount of eggs resulting in small larvae with no chances to survive. Our findings help to better understand the mass mortalities occurring at early stages of marine fish.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Born small, die young: Intrinsic, size-selective mortality in marine larval fish 2015, 5:17065 Scientific Reports
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
24-Nov-2015
DOI:
10.1038/srep17065
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep17065
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarrido, S.en
dc.contributor.authorBen-Hamadou, R.en
dc.contributor.authorSantos, A.M.P.en
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, S.en
dc.contributor.authorTeodósio, M.A.en
dc.contributor.authorCotano, U.en
dc.contributor.authorIrigoien, Xabieren
dc.contributor.authorPeck, M.A.en
dc.contributor.authorSaiz, E.en
dc.contributor.authorRé, P.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-27T13:25:50Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-27T13:25:50Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11-24en
dc.identifier.citationBorn small, die young: Intrinsic, size-selective mortality in marine larval fish 2015, 5:17065 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep17065en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/592605en
dc.description.abstractMortality during the early stages is a major cause of the natural variations in the size and recruitment strength of marine fish populations. In this study, the relation between the size-at-hatch and early survival was assessed using laboratory experiments and on field-caught larvae of the European sardine (Sardina pilchardus). Larval size-at-hatch was not related to the egg size but was significantly, positively related to the diameter of the otolith-at-hatch. Otolith diameter-at-hatch was also significantly correlated with survival-at-age in fed and unfed larvae in the laboratory. For sardine larvae collected in the Bay of Biscay during the spring of 2008, otolith radius-at-hatch was also significantly related to viability. Larval mortality has frequently been related to adverse environmental conditions and intrinsic factors affecting feeding ability and vulnerability to predators. Our study offers evidence indicating that a significant portion of fish mortality occurs during the endogenous (yolk) and mixed (yolk /prey) feeding period in the absence of predators, revealing that marine fish with high fecundity, such as small pelagics, can spawn a relatively large amount of eggs resulting in small larvae with no chances to survive. Our findings help to better understand the mass mortalities occurring at early stages of marine fish.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep17065en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleBorn small, die young: Intrinsic, size-selective mortality in marine larval fishen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera, Av. Brasília s/n, 1449-006 Lisboa, Portugalen
dc.contributor.institutionMarine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugalen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological and Environmental Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, PO Box 2713, Doha, Qataren
dc.contributor.institutionCentro de Ciências do Mar do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve. Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugalen
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Research Unit – AZTI Foundation, Herrera Kaia, Portualdea z/g, 20110 Pasaia, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries Science, Hamburg University, Olbersweg 24, 22767 Hamburg, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut de Ciències del Mar - CSIC, Ps. Marítim de la Barceloneta 37–49, 08003 Barcelona, Spainen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorIrigoien, Xabieren
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