Variation for N Uptake System in Maize: Genotypic Response to N Supply

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/583076
Title:
Variation for N Uptake System in Maize: Genotypic Response to N Supply
Authors:
Garnett, Trevor; Plett, Darren; Conn, Vanessa; Conn, Simon; Rabie, Huwaida; Rafalski, J. Antoni; Dhugga, Kanwarpal; Tester, Mark A. ( 0000-0002-5085-8801 ) ; Kaiser, Brent N.
Abstract:
An understanding of the adaptations made by plants in their nitrogen (N) uptake systems in response to reduced N supply is important to the development of cereals with enhanced N uptake efficiency (NUpE). Twenty seven diverse genotypes of maize (Zea mays, L.) were grown in hydroponics for 3 weeks with limiting or adequate N supply. Genotypic response to N was assessed on the basis of biomass characteristics and the activities of the nitrate (NO−3) and ammonium (NH+4) high-affinity transport systems. Genotypes differed greatly for the ability to maintain biomass with reduced N. Although, the N response in underlying biomass and N transport related characteristics was less than that for biomass, there were clear relationships, most importantly, lines that maintained biomass at reduced N maintained net N uptake with no change in size of the root relative to the shoot. The root uptake capacity for both NO−3 and NH+4 increased with reduced N. Transcript levels of putative NO−3 and NH+4 transporter genes in the root tissue of a subset of the genotypes revealed that predominately ZmNRT2 transcript levels responded to N treatments. The correlation between the ratio of transcripts of ZmNRT2.2 between the two N levels and a genotype's ability to maintain biomass with reduced N suggests a role for these transporters in enhancing NUpE. The observed variation in the ability to capture N at low N provides scope for both improving NUpE in maize and also to better understand the N uptake system in cereals.
KAUST Department:
Center for Desert Agriculture
Citation:
Variation for N Uptake System in Maize: Genotypic Response to N Supply 2015, 6 Frontiers in Plant Science
Publisher:
Frontiers Media SA
Journal:
Frontiers in Plant Science
Issue Date:
9-Nov-2015
DOI:
10.3389/fpls.2015.00936
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1664-462X
Additional Links:
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2015.00936
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Center for Desert Agriculture

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarnett, Trevoren
dc.contributor.authorPlett, Darrenen
dc.contributor.authorConn, Vanessaen
dc.contributor.authorConn, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorRabie, Huwaidaen
dc.contributor.authorRafalski, J. Antonien
dc.contributor.authorDhugga, Kanwarpalen
dc.contributor.authorTester, Mark A.en
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Brent N.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-01T13:46:32Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-01T13:46:32Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11-09en
dc.identifier.citationVariation for N Uptake System in Maize: Genotypic Response to N Supply 2015, 6 Frontiers in Plant Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn1664-462Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpls.2015.00936en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/583076en
dc.description.abstractAn understanding of the adaptations made by plants in their nitrogen (N) uptake systems in response to reduced N supply is important to the development of cereals with enhanced N uptake efficiency (NUpE). Twenty seven diverse genotypes of maize (Zea mays, L.) were grown in hydroponics for 3 weeks with limiting or adequate N supply. Genotypic response to N was assessed on the basis of biomass characteristics and the activities of the nitrate (NO−3) and ammonium (NH+4) high-affinity transport systems. Genotypes differed greatly for the ability to maintain biomass with reduced N. Although, the N response in underlying biomass and N transport related characteristics was less than that for biomass, there were clear relationships, most importantly, lines that maintained biomass at reduced N maintained net N uptake with no change in size of the root relative to the shoot. The root uptake capacity for both NO−3 and NH+4 increased with reduced N. Transcript levels of putative NO−3 and NH+4 transporter genes in the root tissue of a subset of the genotypes revealed that predominately ZmNRT2 transcript levels responded to N treatments. The correlation between the ratio of transcripts of ZmNRT2.2 between the two N levels and a genotype's ability to maintain biomass with reduced N suggests a role for these transporters in enhancing NUpE. The observed variation in the ability to capture N at low N provides scope for both improving NUpE in maize and also to better understand the N uptake system in cereals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2015.00936en
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en
dc.subjectN, nitrateen
dc.subjectammoniumen
dc.subjectnitrogen use efficiencyen
dc.subjectNUEen
dc.subjectuptakeen
dc.subjectZea maysen
dc.titleVariation for N Uptake System in Maize: Genotypic Response to N Supplyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Plant Scienceen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionMathematics Department, Bethlehem University, Bethlehem, Palestineen
dc.contributor.institutionDuPont Crop Genetics, Wilmington, DE, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionGenetic Discovery, DuPont Pioneer, Johnston, IA, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale, CNRS, Grenoble, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Delaware, Wilmington, DE, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionInternational Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, Texcoco, Mexicoen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Center For Carbon Water and Food, The University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorTester, Mark A.en
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.