The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/582649
Title:
The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change
Authors:
Stenchikov, Georgiy L. ( 0000-0001-9033-4925 )
Abstract:
Explosive volcanic eruptions are magnificent events that in many ways affect the Earth's natural processes and climate. They cause sporadic perturbations of the planet's energy balance, activating complex climate feedbacks and providing unique opportunities to better quantify those processes. We know that explosive eruptions cause cooling in the atmosphere for a few years, but we have just recently realized that volcanic signals can be seen in the subsurface ocean for decades. The volcanic forcing of the previous two centuries offsets the ocean heat uptake and diminishes global warming by about 30%. The explosive volcanism of the twenty-first century is unlikely to either cause any significant climate signal or to delay the pace of global warming. The recent interest in dynamic, microphysical, chemical, and climate impacts of volcanic eruptions is also excited by the fact that these impacts provide a natural analogue for climate geoengineering schemes involving deliberate development of an artificial aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere to counteract global warming. In this chapter we aim to discuss these recently discovered volcanic effects and specifically pay attention to how we can learn about the hidden Earth-system mechanisms activated by explosive volcanic eruptions. To demonstrate these effects we use our own model results when possible along with available observations, as well as review closely related recent publications.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Georgiy Stenchikov, Chapter 26 - The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change, In Climate Change (Second Edition), edited by Trevor M. Letcher, Elsevier, Boston, 2016, Pages 419-447, ISBN 9780444635242, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63524-2.00026-9.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Climate Change
Issue Date:
23-Sep-2015
DOI:
10.1016/B978-0-444-63524-2.00026-9
Type:
Book Chapter
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780444635242000269
Appears in Collections:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Book Chapters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStenchikov, Georgiy L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-25T12:37:42Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-25T12:37:42Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-23en
dc.identifier.citationGeorgiy Stenchikov, Chapter 26 - The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change, In Climate Change (Second Edition), edited by Trevor M. Letcher, Elsevier, Boston, 2016, Pages 419-447, ISBN 9780444635242, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63524-2.00026-9.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-444-63524-2.00026-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/582649en
dc.description.abstractExplosive volcanic eruptions are magnificent events that in many ways affect the Earth's natural processes and climate. They cause sporadic perturbations of the planet's energy balance, activating complex climate feedbacks and providing unique opportunities to better quantify those processes. We know that explosive eruptions cause cooling in the atmosphere for a few years, but we have just recently realized that volcanic signals can be seen in the subsurface ocean for decades. The volcanic forcing of the previous two centuries offsets the ocean heat uptake and diminishes global warming by about 30%. The explosive volcanism of the twenty-first century is unlikely to either cause any significant climate signal or to delay the pace of global warming. The recent interest in dynamic, microphysical, chemical, and climate impacts of volcanic eruptions is also excited by the fact that these impacts provide a natural analogue for climate geoengineering schemes involving deliberate development of an artificial aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere to counteract global warming. In this chapter we aim to discuss these recently discovered volcanic effects and specifically pay attention to how we can learn about the hidden Earth-system mechanisms activated by explosive volcanic eruptions. To demonstrate these effects we use our own model results when possible along with available observations, as well as review closely related recent publications.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780444635242000269en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Climate Change. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Climate Change, 23 September 2015. DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63524-2.00026-9en
dc.subjectAerosolsen
dc.subjectAtlantic meridional overturning circulationen
dc.subjectAmocen
dc.subjectAOen
dc.subjectNAOen
dc.subjectOcean coolingen
dc.subjectRadiative forcingen
dc.subjectSea iceen
dc.subjectWinter warmingen
dc.titleThe Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Changeen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalClimate Changeen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorStenchikov, Georgiy L.en
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