Osmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranes

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/579156
Title:
Osmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranes
Authors:
Zaher, A. ( 0000-0002-5521-5389 ) ; Li, S.; Wolf, K. T.; Pirmoradi, F. N.; Yassine, Omar ( 0000-0002-0117-8017 ) ; Lin, L.; Khashab, Niveen M. ( 0000-0003-2728-0666 ) ; Kosel, Jürgen ( 0000-0002-8998-8275 )
Abstract:
Implantable drug delivery systems can provide long-term reliability, controllability, and biocompatibility, and have been used in many applications, including cancer pain and non-malignant pain treatment. However, many of the available systems are limited to zero-order, inconsistent, or single burst event drug release. To address these limitations, we demonstrate prototypes of a remotely operated drug delivery device that offers controllability of drug release profiles, using osmotic pumping as a pressure source and magnetically triggered membranes as switchable on-demand valves. The membranes are made of either ethyl cellulose, or the proposed stronger cellulose acetate polymer, mixed with thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel and superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. The prototype devices' drug diffusion rates are on the order of 0.5–2 μg/h for higher release rate designs, and 12–40 ng/h for lower release rates, with maximum release ratios of 4.2 and 3.2, respectively. The devices exhibit increased drug delivery rates with higher osmotic pumping rates or with magnetically increased membrane porosity. Furthermore, by vapor deposition of a cyanoacrylate layer, a drastic reduction of the drug delivery rate from micrograms down to tens of nanograms per hour is achieved. By utilizing magnetic membranes as the valve-control mechanism, triggered remotely by means of induction heating, the demonstrated drug delivery devices benefit from having the power source external to the system, eliminating the need for a battery. These designs multiply the potential approaches towards increasing the on-demand controllability and customizability of drug delivery profiles in the expanding field of implantable drug delivery systems, with the future possibility of remotely controlling the pressure source.
KAUST Department:
Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division; Smart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) lab
Citation:
Osmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranes 2015, 9 (5):054113 Biomicrofluidics
Publisher:
AIP Publishing
Journal:
Biomicrofluidics
Issue Date:
29-Sep-2015
DOI:
10.1063/1.4931954
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-1058
Additional Links:
http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/bmf/9/5/10.1063/1.4931954
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Controlled Release and Delivery Laboratory; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZaher, A.en
dc.contributor.authorLi, S.en
dc.contributor.authorWolf, K. T.en
dc.contributor.authorPirmoradi, F. N.en
dc.contributor.authorYassine, Omaren
dc.contributor.authorLin, L.en
dc.contributor.authorKhashab, Niveen M.en
dc.contributor.authorKosel, Jürgenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-04T12:21:17Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-04T12:21:17Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-29en
dc.identifier.citationOsmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranes 2015, 9 (5):054113 Biomicrofluidicsen
dc.identifier.issn1932-1058en
dc.identifier.doi10.1063/1.4931954en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/579156en
dc.description.abstractImplantable drug delivery systems can provide long-term reliability, controllability, and biocompatibility, and have been used in many applications, including cancer pain and non-malignant pain treatment. However, many of the available systems are limited to zero-order, inconsistent, or single burst event drug release. To address these limitations, we demonstrate prototypes of a remotely operated drug delivery device that offers controllability of drug release profiles, using osmotic pumping as a pressure source and magnetically triggered membranes as switchable on-demand valves. The membranes are made of either ethyl cellulose, or the proposed stronger cellulose acetate polymer, mixed with thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel and superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. The prototype devices' drug diffusion rates are on the order of 0.5–2 μg/h for higher release rate designs, and 12–40 ng/h for lower release rates, with maximum release ratios of 4.2 and 3.2, respectively. The devices exhibit increased drug delivery rates with higher osmotic pumping rates or with magnetically increased membrane porosity. Furthermore, by vapor deposition of a cyanoacrylate layer, a drastic reduction of the drug delivery rate from micrograms down to tens of nanograms per hour is achieved. By utilizing magnetic membranes as the valve-control mechanism, triggered remotely by means of induction heating, the demonstrated drug delivery devices benefit from having the power source external to the system, eliminating the need for a battery. These designs multiply the potential approaches towards increasing the on-demand controllability and customizability of drug delivery profiles in the expanding field of implantable drug delivery systems, with the future possibility of remotely controlling the pressure source.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAIP Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/bmf/9/5/10.1063/1.4931954en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Biomicrofluidicsen
dc.titleOsmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAdvanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentSmart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) laben
dc.identifier.journalBiomicrofluidicsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Engineering, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7, Canadaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, California 94720, USAen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorKosel, Jürgenen
kaust.authorLi, S.en
kaust.authorYassine, Omaren
kaust.authorKhashab, Niveen M.en
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