Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/578909
Title:
Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean
Authors:
Johansen, J.L.; Pratchett, M.S.; Messmer, V.; Coker, D.J.; Tobin, A.J.; Hoey, A.S.
Abstract:
Increased ocean temperature due to climate change is raising metabolic demands and energy requirements of marine ectotherms. If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure. Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals. However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity. Consequently, ubiquitous increases in energy consumption due to climate change will increase top-down competition for a dwindling biomass of prey, potentially distorting entire food webs and associated fisheries.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean 2015, 5:13830 Scientific Reports
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
8-Sep-2015
DOI:
10.1038/srep13830
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/srep13830
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohansen, J.L.en
dc.contributor.authorPratchett, M.S.en
dc.contributor.authorMessmer, V.en
dc.contributor.authorCoker, D.J.en
dc.contributor.authorTobin, A.J.en
dc.contributor.authorHoey, A.S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-30T08:48:41Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-30T08:48:41Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-08en
dc.identifier.citationLarge predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean 2015, 5:13830 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep13830en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/578909en
dc.description.abstractIncreased ocean temperature due to climate change is raising metabolic demands and energy requirements of marine ectotherms. If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure. Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals. However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity. Consequently, ubiquitous increases in energy consumption due to climate change will increase top-down competition for a dwindling biomass of prey, potentially distorting entire food webs and associated fisheries.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/srep13830en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleLarge predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming oceanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionWhitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience, University of Florida, St. Augustine, 32080, Florida, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorCoker, Darren Jamesen
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