Time-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surface

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/577313
Title:
Time-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surface
Authors:
Li, Erqiang ( 0000-0002-5003-0756 ) ; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T. ( 0000-0001-6997-4311 )
Abstract:
When a drop impacts on a solid surface, its rapid deceleration is cushioned by a thin layer of air, which leads to the entrapment of a bubble under its centre. For large impact velocities the lubrication pressure in this air layer becomes large enough to compress the air. Herein we use high-speed interferometry, with 200 ns time-resolution, to directly observe the thickness evolution of the air layer during the entire bubble entrapment process. The initial disc radius and thickness shows excellent agreement with available theoretical models, based on adiabatic compression. For the largest impact velocities the air is compressed by as much as a factor of 14. Immediately following the contact, the air disc shows rapid vertical expansion. The radial speed of the surface minima just before contact, can reach 50 times the impact velocity of the drop.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Clean Combustion Research Center
Citation:
Time-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surface 2015, 780:636 Journal of Fluid Mechanics
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Journal:
Journal of Fluid Mechanics
Issue Date:
7-Sep-2015
DOI:
10.1017/jfm.2015.466
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0022-1120; 1469-7645
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022112015004668
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Clean Combustion Research Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Erqiangen
dc.contributor.authorThoroddsen, Sigurdur T.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-15T12:35:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-15T12:35:57Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-07en
dc.identifier.citationTime-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surface 2015, 780:636 Journal of Fluid Mechanicsen
dc.identifier.issn0022-1120en
dc.identifier.issn1469-7645en
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/jfm.2015.466en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/577313en
dc.description.abstractWhen a drop impacts on a solid surface, its rapid deceleration is cushioned by a thin layer of air, which leads to the entrapment of a bubble under its centre. For large impact velocities the lubrication pressure in this air layer becomes large enough to compress the air. Herein we use high-speed interferometry, with 200 ns time-resolution, to directly observe the thickness evolution of the air layer during the entire bubble entrapment process. The initial disc radius and thickness shows excellent agreement with available theoretical models, based on adiabatic compression. For the largest impact velocities the air is compressed by as much as a factor of 14. Immediately following the contact, the air disc shows rapid vertical expansion. The radial speed of the surface minima just before contact, can reach 50 times the impact velocity of the drop.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022112015004668en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Fluid Mechanicsen
dc.subjectbubble dynamicsen
dc.subjectdrops and bubblesen
dc.subjectlubrication theoryen
dc.titleTime-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surfaceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Centeren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Fluid Mechanicsen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorLi, Erqiangen
kaust.authorThoroddsen, Sigurdur T.en
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