Dynamics of microbial communities in an integrated ultrafiltration–reverse osmosis desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/576458
Title:
Dynamics of microbial communities in an integrated ultrafiltration–reverse osmosis desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf
Authors:
Hong, Pei-Ying ( 0000-0002-4474-6600 ) ; Moosa, Nasir; Mink, Justine
Abstract:
This study demonstrated the use of high-throughput sequencing to assess the efficacy of an integrated ultrafiltration (UF)–reverse osmosis (RO) desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf, and to identify potential microbial-associated problems that may arise in this plant. When integrated into the desalination treatment system, the UF membranes were able to serve as a good pretreatment strategy to delay RO fouling by achieving up to 1.96-log removal of cells from the seawater. Consequently, the differential pressure of the RO membrane remained around 1 bar for the entire six-month study, suggesting no significant biofouling performance issue identified for this RO system. Examples of microbial populations effectively removed by the UF membranes from the feed waters included Nitrosoarchaeum limnia and phototrophic eukaryotes. Microbial-associated problems observed in this pilot plant included the presence of Pseudomonas spp. in coexistence with Desulfovibrio spp. These two bacterial populations can reduce sulfate and produce hydrogen sulfide, which would in turn cause corrosion problems or compromise membrane integrities. Chemical-enhanced backwashing (CEB) can be used as an effective strategy to minimize the associated microbial problems by removing bacterial populations including sulfate reducers from the UF membranes.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Dynamics of microbial communities in an integrated ultrafiltration–reverse osmosis desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf 2015:1 Desalination and Water Treatment
Publisher:
Informa UK Limited
Journal:
Desalination and Water Treatment
Issue Date:
27-Aug-2015
DOI:
10.1080/19443994.2015.1083483
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1944-3994; 1944-3986
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19443994.2015.1083483
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHong, Pei-Yingen
dc.contributor.authorMoosa, Nasiren
dc.contributor.authorMink, Justineen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-03T12:15:18Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-03T12:15:18Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-27en
dc.identifier.citationDynamics of microbial communities in an integrated ultrafiltration–reverse osmosis desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf 2015:1 Desalination and Water Treatmenten
dc.identifier.issn1944-3994en
dc.identifier.issn1944-3986en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19443994.2015.1083483en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/576458en
dc.description.abstractThis study demonstrated the use of high-throughput sequencing to assess the efficacy of an integrated ultrafiltration (UF)–reverse osmosis (RO) desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulf, and to identify potential microbial-associated problems that may arise in this plant. When integrated into the desalination treatment system, the UF membranes were able to serve as a good pretreatment strategy to delay RO fouling by achieving up to 1.96-log removal of cells from the seawater. Consequently, the differential pressure of the RO membrane remained around 1 bar for the entire six-month study, suggesting no significant biofouling performance issue identified for this RO system. Examples of microbial populations effectively removed by the UF membranes from the feed waters included Nitrosoarchaeum limnia and phototrophic eukaryotes. Microbial-associated problems observed in this pilot plant included the presence of Pseudomonas spp. in coexistence with Desulfovibrio spp. These two bacterial populations can reduce sulfate and produce hydrogen sulfide, which would in turn cause corrosion problems or compromise membrane integrities. Chemical-enhanced backwashing (CEB) can be used as an effective strategy to minimize the associated microbial problems by removing bacterial populations including sulfate reducers from the UF membranes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19443994.2015.1083483en
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Desalination and Water Treatment on 27 Aug 2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19443994.2015.1083483.en
dc.subjectHigh-throughput sequencingen
dc.subjectBiofoulingen
dc.subjectChemical-enhanced backwashingen
dc.subjectPseudomonasen
dc.subjectSulfate reducersen
dc.titleDynamics of microbial communities in an integrated ultrafiltration–reverse osmosis desalination pilot plant located at the Arabian Gulfen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalDesalination and Water Treatmenten
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDow KSA R&D Center, Dow Saudi Arabia Company, KAUST Research Park Innovation Cluster Building 3, Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorHong, Pei-Yingen
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