Ecology of overwintering sprat (Sprattus sprattus)

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/576094
Title:
Ecology of overwintering sprat (Sprattus sprattus)
Authors:
Solberg, Ingrid; Røstad, Anders ( 0000-0002-2512-9033 ) ; Kaartvedt, Stein ( 0000-0002-8793-2948 )
Abstract:
We used moored upward-facing echosounders in combination with field campaigns to address the overwintering ecology of the clupeid sprat (Sprattus sprattus) throughout four separate winters in a Norwegian fjord. The stationary echosounders were cabled to shore and provided continuous measurements at a temporal resolution of seconds. The long-term coverage of several winters enabled study of the sprat behavior in relation to different biotic parameters like abundance, vertical distribution and taxonomic composition of potential prey and predators, as well as environmental conditions like ice-free vs. ice-covered waters and hypoxic- vs. normoxic conditions. Also the size distribution of the sprat differed significantly between years. The majority of the large-size classes had empty stomachs, particularly prominent in one winter. Otherwise, the diet of the sprat seemed to vary according to the fluctuating mesozooplankton community, yet with calanoid copepods being the most common prey in the sprat stomachs all winters. Krill were not common prey apart for the largest sprat in one winter, but particularly large concentrations of krill appeared to mitigate predation pressure from gadoids, which then preferred krill as prey. During daytime, sprat distribution and swimming behavior varied according to the oxygen conditions. Solitary swimming in near-bottom-waters (∼ 150m) prevailed in moderate hypoxia (30% O2 saturation) as opposed to schooling in mid-waters when the deep waters were oxygen depleted (0 - 7% O2 saturation). Nevertheless, a bimodal vertical distribution with an additional part of the sprat population distributed in upper waters was common in all years. The sprat carried out diel vertical migration (DVM) in all winters, but the patterns varied, and included both normal and asynchronous DVM, including fish with a somewhat deeper nocturnal than daytime distribution. Moreover, individual sprat carried out short and rapid excursions to the surface during the night in all years, likely for gulping atmospheric air. Ice conditions imposed a behavioral response with the sprat moving to shallower depths after the ice covering. The varied ecology and behavior observed throughout the course of four consecutive years underlines the importance of conducting long-term studies for the understanding of overwintering strategies. Overall, this study provided unique insight into the dynamic conditions that a population of fish may encounter while overwintering, providing novel information on a scarcely described phase in the life history of fish at high latitudes.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Ecology of overwintering sprat (Sprattus sprattus) 2015 Progress in Oceanography
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Progress in Oceanography
Issue Date:
21-Aug-2015
DOI:
10.1016/j.pocean.2015.08.003
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00796611
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0079661115001755
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSolberg, Ingriden
dc.contributor.authorRøstad, Andersen
dc.contributor.authorKaartvedt, Steinen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-30T11:22:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-30T11:22:10Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-21en
dc.identifier.citationEcology of overwintering sprat (Sprattus sprattus) 2015 Progress in Oceanographyen
dc.identifier.issn00796611en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pocean.2015.08.003en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/576094en
dc.description.abstractWe used moored upward-facing echosounders in combination with field campaigns to address the overwintering ecology of the clupeid sprat (Sprattus sprattus) throughout four separate winters in a Norwegian fjord. The stationary echosounders were cabled to shore and provided continuous measurements at a temporal resolution of seconds. The long-term coverage of several winters enabled study of the sprat behavior in relation to different biotic parameters like abundance, vertical distribution and taxonomic composition of potential prey and predators, as well as environmental conditions like ice-free vs. ice-covered waters and hypoxic- vs. normoxic conditions. Also the size distribution of the sprat differed significantly between years. The majority of the large-size classes had empty stomachs, particularly prominent in one winter. Otherwise, the diet of the sprat seemed to vary according to the fluctuating mesozooplankton community, yet with calanoid copepods being the most common prey in the sprat stomachs all winters. Krill were not common prey apart for the largest sprat in one winter, but particularly large concentrations of krill appeared to mitigate predation pressure from gadoids, which then preferred krill as prey. During daytime, sprat distribution and swimming behavior varied according to the oxygen conditions. Solitary swimming in near-bottom-waters (∼ 150m) prevailed in moderate hypoxia (30% O2 saturation) as opposed to schooling in mid-waters when the deep waters were oxygen depleted (0 - 7% O2 saturation). Nevertheless, a bimodal vertical distribution with an additional part of the sprat population distributed in upper waters was common in all years. The sprat carried out diel vertical migration (DVM) in all winters, but the patterns varied, and included both normal and asynchronous DVM, including fish with a somewhat deeper nocturnal than daytime distribution. Moreover, individual sprat carried out short and rapid excursions to the surface during the night in all years, likely for gulping atmospheric air. Ice conditions imposed a behavioral response with the sprat moving to shallower depths after the ice covering. The varied ecology and behavior observed throughout the course of four consecutive years underlines the importance of conducting long-term studies for the understanding of overwintering strategies. Overall, this study provided unique insight into the dynamic conditions that a population of fish may encounter while overwintering, providing novel information on a scarcely described phase in the life history of fish at high latitudes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0079661115001755en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Progress in Oceanography. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Progress in Oceanography, 21 August 2015. DOI: 10.1016/j.pocean.2015.08.003en
dc.subjectSpraten
dc.subjectEcologyen
dc.subjectOverwinteringen
dc.subjectFeedingen
dc.subjectBehavioren
dc.subjectHypoxiaen
dc.titleEcology of overwintering sprat (Sprattus sprattus)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalProgress in Oceanographyen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biosciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norwayen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorSolberg, Ingriden
kaust.authorRøstad, Andersen
kaust.authorKaartvedt, Steinen
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