Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/576008
Title:
Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei
Authors:
Vega, Fernando E.; Brown, Stuart M.; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B.; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F.; Pain, Arnab ( 0000-0002-1755-2819 )
Abstract:
The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. The draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies.
KAUST Department:
Pathogen Genomics Laboratory; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
Citation:
Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei 2015, 5:12525 Scientific Reports
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
31-Jul-2015
DOI:
10.1038/srep12525
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/srep12525
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC); Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVega, Fernando E.en
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Stuart M.en
dc.contributor.authorChen, Haoen
dc.contributor.authorShen, Ericen
dc.contributor.authorNair, Mridul B.en
dc.contributor.authorCeja-Navarro, Javier A.en
dc.contributor.authorBrodie, Eoin L.en
dc.contributor.authorInfante, Franciscoen
dc.contributor.authorDowd, Patrick F.en
dc.contributor.authorPain, Arnaben
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-27T06:02:23Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-27T06:02:23Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-31en
dc.identifier.citationDraft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei 2015, 5:12525 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep12525en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/576008en
dc.description.abstractThe coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. The draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/srep12525en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleDraft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampeien
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPathogen Genomics Laboratoryen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionSustainable Perennial Crops Laboratory, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Bldg. 001, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionNYU Center for Health Informatics and Bioinformatics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionEcology Department, Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionEl Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Carretera Antiguo Aeropuerto Km. 2.5, Tapachula, 30700 Chiapas, Méxicoen
dc.contributor.institutionCrop Bioprotection Research Unit, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Peoria, Illinois 61604 USAen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorNair, Mridulen
kaust.authorPain, Arnaben
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