Best behaviour? Ontologies and the formal description of animal behaviour

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/575656
Title:
Best behaviour? Ontologies and the formal description of animal behaviour
Authors:
Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Hoehndorf, Robert ( 0000-0001-8149-5890 ) ; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Schofield, Paul N.
Abstract:
The development of ontologies for describing animal behaviour has proved to be one of the most difficult of all scientific knowledge domains. Ranging from neurological processes to human emotions, the range and scope needed for such ontologies is highly challenging, but if data integration and computational tools such as automated reasoning are to be fully applied in this important area the underlying principles of these ontologies need to be better established and development needs detailed coordination. Whilst the state of scientific knowledge is always paramount in ontology and formal description framework design, this is a particular problem with neurobehavioural ontologies where our understanding of the relationship between behaviour and its underlying biophysical basis is currently in its infancy. In this commentary, we discuss some of the fundamental problems in designing and using behaviour ontologies, and present some of the best developed tools in this domain. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York
KAUST Department:
Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division; Computer Science Program; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Mammalian Genome
Issue Date:
28-Jul-2015
DOI:
10.1007/s00335-015-9590-y
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0938-8990; 1432-1777
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Computer Science Program; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC); Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGkoutos, Georgios V.en
dc.contributor.authorHoehndorf, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorTsaprouni, Loukiaen
dc.contributor.authorSchofield, Paul N.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-24T08:35:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-24T08:35:10Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-28en
dc.identifier.issn0938-8990en
dc.identifier.issn1432-1777en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00335-015-9590-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/575656en
dc.description.abstractThe development of ontologies for describing animal behaviour has proved to be one of the most difficult of all scientific knowledge domains. Ranging from neurological processes to human emotions, the range and scope needed for such ontologies is highly challenging, but if data integration and computational tools such as automated reasoning are to be fully applied in this important area the underlying principles of these ontologies need to be better established and development needs detailed coordination. Whilst the state of scientific knowledge is always paramount in ontology and formal description framework design, this is a particular problem with neurobehavioural ontologies where our understanding of the relationship between behaviour and its underlying biophysical basis is currently in its infancy. In this commentary, we discuss some of the fundamental problems in designing and using behaviour ontologies, and present some of the best developed tools in this domain. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New Yorken
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.titleBest behaviour? Ontologies and the formal description of animal behaviouren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.identifier.journalMammalian Genomeen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Computer Science, University of Aberystwyth, Old College, King Street, Aberystwyth, SY23 2AX, UKen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Computational Biology, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UKen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Sport and Physical Activity Research (ISPAR), University of Bedfordshire, Bedfordshire, UKen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physiology Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKen
kaust.authorHoehndorf, Roberten
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