Interspecific and locational differences in metal levels in edible fish tissue from Saudi Arabia

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/575602
Title:
Interspecific and locational differences in metal levels in edible fish tissue from Saudi Arabia
Authors:
Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Batang, Zenon B. ( 0000-0003-4593-0589 ) ; Mannalamkunnath Alikunhi, Nabeel; Djebbi, Ramzi ( 0000-0002-6624-2905 ) ; Al-Jebreen, Dalal; Aziz, Mohammed A. M.; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.
Abstract:
Metal levels in fish have been extensively studied, but little data currently exists for the Middle East. We examined the levels of metals and metalloids (aluminum, arsenic, copper, manganese, selenium, zinc, and mercury) in the flesh of 13 fish species collected from three fishing sites and a local fish market in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We tested the following null hypotheses: (1) there are no interspecific differences in metal levels, (2) there are no differences in metal levels in fishes between market and fishing sites, (3) there are no size-related differences in metal levels, and (4) there are no differences in selenium:mercury molar ratio among different fish species. There were significant interspecific differences in concentrations for all metals. There was an order of magnitude difference in the levels of aluminum, arsenic, mercury, manganese, and selenium, indicating wide variation in potential effects on the fish themselves and on their predators. Fishes from Area II, close to a large commercial port, had the highest levels of arsenic, mercury, and selenium, followed by market fishes. Mercury was positively correlated with body size in 6 of the 13 fish species examined. Mercury was correlated positively with arsenic and selenium, but negatively with aluminum, cobalt, copper, manganese, and zinc. Selenium:mercury molar ratios varied significantly among species, with Carangoides bajad, Cephalopholis argus, Variola louti, and Ephinephelus tauvina having ratios below 10:1. These findings can be used in risk assessments, design of mercury reduction plans, development of fish advisories to protect public health, and future management decision-making.
KAUST Department:
Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Issue Date:
6-Jul-2014
DOI:
10.1007/s10661-014-3885-4
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0167-6369; 1573-2959
Sponsors:
This research was funded by the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) to KAUST (KAUST/MoA 228211), with additional funds to JB and MG from EOHSI, the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (Department of Energy, DE-FC01-86EW07053), NIEHS (P30ES005022), and Rutgers University. We thank the KAUST Administration and CMOR staff for the invaluable support and assistance throughout the project implementation. We also thank the many people who have discussed these topics with us, or who have helped in the research, including R. Schoeny, A. Stern, D. Carpenter, N. Ralston, M. Lemire, D. Mergler, S. Silbernagel, E. Silbergeld, E. Groth, C. Chess, C. Powers, D. Kosson, J. Clarke, C. Jeitner, T. Pittfield, and M. Donio. The views and opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors, and do not represent the funding agencies.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBurger, Joannaen
dc.contributor.authorGochfeld, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorBatang, Zenon B.en
dc.contributor.authorMannalamkunnath Alikunhi, Nabeelen
dc.contributor.authorDjebbi, Ramzien
dc.contributor.authorAl-Jebreen, Dalalen
dc.contributor.authorAziz, Mohammed A. M.en
dc.contributor.authorAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-24T08:33:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-24T08:33:57Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07-06en
dc.identifier.issn0167-6369en
dc.identifier.issn1573-2959en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10661-014-3885-4en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/575602en
dc.description.abstractMetal levels in fish have been extensively studied, but little data currently exists for the Middle East. We examined the levels of metals and metalloids (aluminum, arsenic, copper, manganese, selenium, zinc, and mercury) in the flesh of 13 fish species collected from three fishing sites and a local fish market in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We tested the following null hypotheses: (1) there are no interspecific differences in metal levels, (2) there are no differences in metal levels in fishes between market and fishing sites, (3) there are no size-related differences in metal levels, and (4) there are no differences in selenium:mercury molar ratio among different fish species. There were significant interspecific differences in concentrations for all metals. There was an order of magnitude difference in the levels of aluminum, arsenic, mercury, manganese, and selenium, indicating wide variation in potential effects on the fish themselves and on their predators. Fishes from Area II, close to a large commercial port, had the highest levels of arsenic, mercury, and selenium, followed by market fishes. Mercury was positively correlated with body size in 6 of the 13 fish species examined. Mercury was correlated positively with arsenic and selenium, but negatively with aluminum, cobalt, copper, manganese, and zinc. Selenium:mercury molar ratios varied significantly among species, with Carangoides bajad, Cephalopholis argus, Variola louti, and Ephinephelus tauvina having ratios below 10:1. These findings can be used in risk assessments, design of mercury reduction plans, development of fish advisories to protect public health, and future management decision-making.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) to KAUST (KAUST/MoA 228211), with additional funds to JB and MG from EOHSI, the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (Department of Energy, DE-FC01-86EW07053), NIEHS (P30ES005022), and Rutgers University. We thank the KAUST Administration and CMOR staff for the invaluable support and assistance throughout the project implementation. We also thank the many people who have discussed these topics with us, or who have helped in the research, including R. Schoeny, A. Stern, D. Carpenter, N. Ralston, M. Lemire, D. Mergler, S. Silbernagel, E. Silbergeld, E. Groth, C. Chess, C. Powers, D. Kosson, J. Clarke, C. Jeitner, T. Pittfield, and M. Donio. The views and opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors, and do not represent the funding agencies.en
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.titleInterspecific and locational differences in metal levels in edible fish tissue from Saudi Arabiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCoastal and Marine Resources Core Laben
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessmenten
dc.contributor.institutionRutgers State Univ, Div Life Sci, Piscataway, NJ 08854 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionRutgers State Univ, Environm & Occupat Hlth Sci Inst, Piscataway, NJ 08854 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionRutgers Robert Wood Johnson Med Sch, Piscataway, NJ USAen
dc.contributor.institutionPrincess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman Univ, Dept Nutr & Food Sci, Riyadh, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.contributor.institutionMinist Agr, Directorate Aquat Environm, Riyadh, Saudi Arabiaen
kaust.authorDjebbi, Ramzien
kaust.authorBatang, Zenon B.en
kaust.authorMannalamkunnath Alikunhi, Nabeelen
kaust.authorAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.en
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