Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/575089
Title:
Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean
Authors:
Veilleux, Heather D.; Ryu, Tae Woo; Donelson, Jennifer M.; van Herwerden, Lynne; Seridi, Loqmane ( 0000-0001-7028-3024 ) ; Ghosheh, Yanal ( 0000-0002-3733-2098 ) ; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 ) ; Leggat, William; Ravasi, Timothy ( 0000-0002-9950-465X ) ; Munday, Philip L.
Abstract:
Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change1, 2, 3, 4; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.
KAUST Department:
KAUST Environmental Epigenetic Program (KEEP); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Program; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean 2015 Nature Climate Change
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Nature Climate change
Issue Date:
20-Jul-2015
DOI:
10.1038/nclimate2724
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1758-678X; 1758-6798
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nclimate2724
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVeilleux, Heather D.en
dc.contributor.authorRyu, Tae Wooen
dc.contributor.authorDonelson, Jennifer M.en
dc.contributor.authorvan Herwerden, Lynneen
dc.contributor.authorSeridi, Loqmaneen
dc.contributor.authorGhosheh, Yanalen
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorLeggat, Williamen
dc.contributor.authorRavasi, Timothyen
dc.contributor.authorMunday, Philip L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T13:54:52Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-18T13:54:52Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-20en
dc.identifier.citationMolecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean 2015 Nature Climate Changeen
dc.identifier.issn1758-678Xen
dc.identifier.issn1758-6798en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nclimate2724en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/575089en
dc.description.abstractSome animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change1, 2, 3, 4; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nclimate2724en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nature Climate Changeen
dc.titleMolecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming oceanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Environmental Epigenetic Program (KEEP)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Mathematics and Computational Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalNature Climate changeen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Marine and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123 Broadway, New South Wales 2007, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Medical, Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorRyu, Tae Wooen
kaust.authorSeridi, Loqmaneen
kaust.authorGhosheh, Yanalen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
kaust.authorRavasi, Timothyen
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