Repetitive elements dynamics in cell identity programming, maintenance and disease

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566160
Title:
Repetitive elements dynamics in cell identity programming, maintenance and disease
Authors:
Bodega, Beatrice; Orlando, Valerio ( 0000-0002-4906-8511 )
Abstract:
The days of 'junk DNA' seem to be over. The rapid progress of genomics technologies has been unveiling unexpected mechanisms by which repetitive DNA and in particular transposable elements (TEs) have evolved, becoming key issues in understanding genome structure and function. Indeed, rather than 'parasites', recent findings strongly suggest that TEs may have a positive function by contributing to tissue specific transcriptional programs, in particular as enhancer-like elements and/or modules for regulation of higher order chromatin structure. Further, it appears that during development and aging genomes experience several waves of TEs activation, and this contributes to individual genome shaping during lifetime. Interestingly, TEs activity is major target of epigenomic regulation. These findings are shedding new light on the genome-phenotype relationship and set the premises to help to explain complex disease manifestation, as consequence of TEs activity deregulation.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; KAUST Environmental Epigenetics Research Program (KEEP)
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Current Opinion in Cell Biology
Issue Date:
Dec-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.ceb.2014.09.002
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09550674
Sponsors:
We thank Federica Marasca and Chiara Lanzuolo for helpful comments and criticisms on the manuscript. The original work of the lab is supported by EPIGEN Italian flagship program (to BB and VO) and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) to VO.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBodega, Beatriceen
dc.contributor.authorOrlando, Valerioen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T09:30:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T09:30:34Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.issn09550674en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ceb.2014.09.002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566160en
dc.description.abstractThe days of 'junk DNA' seem to be over. The rapid progress of genomics technologies has been unveiling unexpected mechanisms by which repetitive DNA and in particular transposable elements (TEs) have evolved, becoming key issues in understanding genome structure and function. Indeed, rather than 'parasites', recent findings strongly suggest that TEs may have a positive function by contributing to tissue specific transcriptional programs, in particular as enhancer-like elements and/or modules for regulation of higher order chromatin structure. Further, it appears that during development and aging genomes experience several waves of TEs activation, and this contributes to individual genome shaping during lifetime. Interestingly, TEs activity is major target of epigenomic regulation. These findings are shedding new light on the genome-phenotype relationship and set the premises to help to explain complex disease manifestation, as consequence of TEs activity deregulation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Federica Marasca and Chiara Lanzuolo for helpful comments and criticisms on the manuscript. The original work of the lab is supported by EPIGEN Italian flagship program (to BB and VO) and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) to VO.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.titleRepetitive elements dynamics in cell identity programming, maintenance and diseaseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Environmental Epigenetics Research Program (KEEP)en
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Cell Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionIst Nazl Genet Mol INGM Romeo & Enrica Invernizzi, Genome Biol Unit, I-20126 Milan, Italyen
kaust.authorOrlando, Valerioen
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