Rapid Elimination of the Persistent Synergid through a Cell Fusion Mechanism

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566155
Title:
Rapid Elimination of the Persistent Synergid through a Cell Fusion Mechanism
Authors:
Maruyama, Daisuke; Volz, Ronny; Takeuchi, Hidenori; Mori, Toshiyuki; Igawa, Tomoko; Kurihara, Daisuke; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Ueda, Minako; Ito, Masaki; Umeda, Masaaki; Nishikawa, Shuhichi; Groß-Hardt, Rita; Higashiyama, Tetsuya
Abstract:
In flowering plants, fertilization-dependent degeneration of the persistent synergid cell ensures one-on-one pairings of male and female gametes. Here, we report that the fusion of the persistent synergid cell and the endosperm selectively inactivates the persistent synergid cell in Arabidopsis thaliana. The synergid-endosperm fusion causes rapid dilution of pre-secreted pollen tube attractant in the persistent synergid cell and selective disorganization of the synergid nucleus during the endosperm proliferation, preventing attractions of excess number of pollen tubes (polytubey). The synergid-endosperm fusion is induced by fertilization of the central cell, while the egg cell fertilization predominantly activates ethylene signaling, an inducer of the synergid nuclear disorganization. Therefore, two female gametes (the egg and the central cell) control independent pathways yet coordinately accomplish the elimination of the persistent synergid cell by double fertilization. Two female gametes (the egg cell and the central cell) in flowering plants coordinately prevent attractions of excess number of pollen tubes via two mechanisms to inactivate persistent synergid cell. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Center for Desert Agriculture
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Cell
Issue Date:
May-2015
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.03.018
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00928674
Sponsors:
We thank T. Kinoshita, S. McCormick, F. Berger, G.N. Drews, and T. Naka-gawa for the materials, N. Iwata, T. Nishii, and T.M. Vu for assistance in preparing materials, S. Tiedemann for genetic analysis, and A. Schnittger for discussions. F. Berger also provided useful comments on the manuscript. D.M. was supported by the Global Center of Excellence program (Nagoya University). D.M. and H.T. were supported by grants 6526 and 5834 from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellowships, respectively. This work was supported in part by Japan Advanced Plant Science Network and by a grant from the Japan Science and Technology Agency (ERATO project to T.H.).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Center for Desert Agriculture; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaruyama, Daisukeen
dc.contributor.authorVolz, Ronnyen
dc.contributor.authorTakeuchi, Hidenorien
dc.contributor.authorMori, Toshiyukien
dc.contributor.authorIgawa, Tomokoen
dc.contributor.authorKurihara, Daisukeen
dc.contributor.authorKawashima, Tomokazuen
dc.contributor.authorUeda, Minakoen
dc.contributor.authorIto, Masakien
dc.contributor.authorUmeda, Masaakien
dc.contributor.authorNishikawa, Shuhichien
dc.contributor.authorGroß-Hardt, Ritaen
dc.contributor.authorHigashiyama, Tetsuyaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T09:30:22Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T09:30:22Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05en
dc.identifier.issn00928674en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cell.2015.03.018en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566155en
dc.description.abstractIn flowering plants, fertilization-dependent degeneration of the persistent synergid cell ensures one-on-one pairings of male and female gametes. Here, we report that the fusion of the persistent synergid cell and the endosperm selectively inactivates the persistent synergid cell in Arabidopsis thaliana. The synergid-endosperm fusion causes rapid dilution of pre-secreted pollen tube attractant in the persistent synergid cell and selective disorganization of the synergid nucleus during the endosperm proliferation, preventing attractions of excess number of pollen tubes (polytubey). The synergid-endosperm fusion is induced by fertilization of the central cell, while the egg cell fertilization predominantly activates ethylene signaling, an inducer of the synergid nuclear disorganization. Therefore, two female gametes (the egg and the central cell) control independent pathways yet coordinately accomplish the elimination of the persistent synergid cell by double fertilization. Two female gametes (the egg cell and the central cell) in flowering plants coordinately prevent attractions of excess number of pollen tubes via two mechanisms to inactivate persistent synergid cell. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank T. Kinoshita, S. McCormick, F. Berger, G.N. Drews, and T. Naka-gawa for the materials, N. Iwata, T. Nishii, and T.M. Vu for assistance in preparing materials, S. Tiedemann for genetic analysis, and A. Schnittger for discussions. F. Berger also provided useful comments on the manuscript. D.M. was supported by the Global Center of Excellence program (Nagoya University). D.M. and H.T. were supported by grants 6526 and 5834 from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellowships, respectively. This work was supported in part by Japan Advanced Plant Science Network and by a grant from the Japan Science and Technology Agency (ERATO project to T.H.).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.titleRapid Elimination of the Persistent Synergid through a Cell Fusion Mechanismen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.identifier.journalCellen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionTemasek Life Sciences Laboratory and Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117604, Singaporeen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Plant Molecular Biology (ZMBP), University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionJST ERATO Higashiyama Live-Holonics Project, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionWaseda Institute for Advanced Study, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionGraduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, 648 Matsudo, Matsudo-City, Chiba 271-8510, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionGregor Mendel Institute, Dr-BohrGasse 3, 1030 Vienna, Austriaen
dc.contributor.institutionGraduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences and School of Agricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi464-8602, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionGraduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionJST, CREST, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Life and Food Science, Graduate School of Science, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, Leobener Straße NW2 28359, Germanyen
kaust.authorVolz, Ronnyen
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