Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566147
Title:
Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins
Authors:
Bigeard, Jean; Rayapuram, Naganand; Pflieger, Delphine; Hirt, Heribert ( 0000-0003-3119-9633 )
Abstract:
In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.
KAUST Department:
Center for Desert Agriculture
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
PROTEOMICS
Issue Date:
10-Jul-2014
DOI:
10.1002/pmic.201400073
Type:
Article
ISSN:
16159853
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-2010-JCJC-1608 to D. P.) and the Laboratory of Excellence Saclay Plant Sciences. We apologize for not citing many other published reports because of space limitations.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Center for Desert Agriculture

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBigeard, Jeanen
dc.contributor.authorRayapuram, Nagananden
dc.contributor.authorPflieger, Delphineen
dc.contributor.authorHirt, Heriberten
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T09:30:04Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T09:30:04Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07-10en
dc.identifier.issn16159853en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pmic.201400073en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566147en
dc.description.abstractIn eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-2010-JCJC-1608 to D. P.) and the Laboratory of Excellence Saclay Plant Sciences. We apologize for not citing many other published reports because of space limitations.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjectArabidopsisen
dc.subjectChromatinen
dc.subjectPlant proteomicsen
dc.subjectProtein kinaseen
dc.subjectProtein phosphorylationen
dc.titlePhosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteinsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.identifier.journalPROTEOMICSen
dc.contributor.institutionUnité de Recherche en Génomique Végétale (URGV); UMR INRA/CNRS/Université d?Evry Val d?Essonne/Saclay Plant Sciences; Evry Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionCNRS, UMR 8587; Evry Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversité Evry Val d?Essonne (UEVE); LAMBE; Evry Franceen
kaust.authorRayapuram, Nagananden
kaust.authorHirt, Heriberten
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